5,203 Things To Do Instead Of Looking At Your Phone

5,203 Things To Do Instead Of Looking At Your Phone

It’s more important than ever to slow down, look up from whatever device you’re on and take a few moments for yourself. If you’re not sure what to do in those few moments, author Barbara Ann Kipfer has plenty of ideas for you! The list-loving lexicographer and editor of Roget’s International Thesaurus joins Ned for a lighthearted chat about recognizing the simple things in life that bring you joy.

Barbara’s books mentioned in this episode:

5,203 Things To Do Instead Of Looking At Your Phone

14,000 Things To Be Happy About

Dr. Hallowell’s new book, ADHD 2.0, comes out January 12th. Pre-order Now!  Click here to pre-order your copy of ADHD 2.0

Check out #NedTalks on TikTok! @drhallowell

Thanks to our sponsor, OmegaBrite Wellness! Dr. H takes OmegaBrite supplements every day and that’s why he invited them to sponsor his podcast. SAVE 20% on your first order at OmegaBriteWellness.com with the promo code: Podcast2020

Click HERE to learn more about our sponsor, Landmark College, in Putney, Vermont. It’s the college of choice for students who learn differently. Dr. H has an honorary degree from Landmark! 

Do you have a question or guest suggestion? Send an email with your thoughts to [email protected].

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin and our recording engineer/editor is Scott Persson.

Check out this episode!

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When Good Is Good Enough: Overcoming Perfectionism

When Good Is Good Enough: Overcoming Perfectionism

ADHD and perfectionism often go hand in hand. And it can be a particularly devastating trap to fall into. Learn how to avoid a perfectionist mindset and recognize negative self-talk as Lauren Krasnow, a certified leadership and executive coach, shares some of the techniques she uses in her practice.

To learn more about Lauren Krasnow, go to her website HERE.

Please continue to reach out to us with your questions and episode ideas! Write an email or record a voice memo and send it to [email protected].

Thanks to our sponsor, OmegaBrite Wellness! Distraction listeners, you can SAVE 20% on your first order with the promo code: Podcast2020 at OmegaBriteWellness.com.

Click HERE to learn more about our sponsor, Landmark College, in Putney, Vermont. It’s the college of choice for students who learn differently.

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin and our recording engineer/editor is Scott Persson.

Check out this episode!

A transcript of this episode is below.


Dr. Hallowell:
This episode of Distraction is sponsored by OmegaBrite CBD. Formulated by OmegaBrite, wellness, creators of the number one, Omega-3 supplements for the past 20 years. OmegaBrite CBD, safe, third-party tested, and it works. Shop online at OmegaBritewellness.com. And by Landmark College offering comprehensive support for students with ADHD and other learning differences. Learn more at [elsiedistraction.org 00:00:00:33]. Landmark College, the college of choice for students who learn differently.

Dr. Hallowell:
Hello and welcome to Distraction. I’m your host, Dr. Ned Hallowell. My guest today is here to help our listeners who struggle with perfectionism. She also can talk about any number of other topics. She’s a professional certified leadership and executive coach to lawyers at major corporate law firms and other professionals. She herself was a long time, big firm, practicing lawyer. She was recognized as top lawyer coach by Diversity Lab and her own words she said, quote, “One lawyer recently told me that I have a gift for getting right to the heart of an issue with a great combination of candor, sensitivity, and humor.” What a great combination those three are. Well, welcome to Distraction, Lauren.

Lauren Krasnow:
Thank you so much, Dr. Hallowell. It’s a pleasure to be here.

Dr. Hallowell:
Well, it’s lovely to have you. You want to just launch right into your thoughts about perfectionism?

Lauren Krasnow:
Sure. Let me start with, all of us struggle with this from time to time and if you’re one of them, which is basically everybody, there’s nothing wrong with you. The only question is how much of an issue is it for you and what do you want to do about it? I actually had the pleasure of studying with you in one of your seminars. And we talked a lot about perfectionism specifically with ADHD and some of the biochemical reasons that it can be harder for people who have ADHD to get themselves out of perfectionism in terms of the self-talk.

Lauren Krasnow:
And I guess I would say one of the best things that I have seen people do in terms of attacking perfectionism is just first becoming aware of it. It’s so very easy for us to conflate the voices in our head with reality. And I think disentangling them is always one of the most important steps and actually a huge chunk of solving the problem. I don’t know if you have anything to say about that, but that to me is once you do that it’s so much easier to actually look at what’s actually going on.

Dr. Hallowell:
Once you do, which… I lost you for a second.

Lauren Krasnow:
Once you just disentangle what’s real from what’s just the running commentary in your head about how bad something is or how good it has to be or the should’s that we put on ourselves. This has to be perfect. And instead of actually saying, “Is this good enough?” we say, “This has to be perfect because…” fill in the blank, “It has to be perfect because I will have failed so-and-so. Somebody in my life who is expecting me to be perfect, or I will… Some parade of horribles will happen.” And that’s not usually the case. I don’t think so. Usually one-

Dr. Hallowell:
No, you’re…

Lauren Krasnow:
… of the most important things is to say what’s real and what’s actually this running commentary going on in my head?

Dr. Hallowell:
And you’re so right. It’s so hard for these folks to do that, because they feel their perception is reality. That they’re abject failures unless they’re perfect.

Lauren Krasnow:
Right. I’m a huge fan of the Calm App. And I know-

Dr. Hallowell:
Yes.

Lauren Krasnow:
… some people are fans of meditation and mindfulness and some people may now be rolling their eyes. But I’m not talking about doing a 20 minute meditation every day, I’m talking about just training yourself for two minutes at a time to be able to have your mind be still so you can recognize in that gap and say, “This happened,” and actually the response that I’m having and saying, “This has to be perfect,” there’s actually a space, a small space where you can say, “Is this actually true?” And I think a lot of us are so conditioned that it becomes automatic. We don’t give ourselves the luxury of being able to see what’s real and what’s not real.

Dr. Hallowell:
Yeah. Would you say it’s pretty hard to do yourself and it’s easier if you can work with someone like you, someone who can coach you out of the bad mental habit of getting down on yourself if you’re less than perfect?

Lauren Krasnow:
Yes and no. I would say yes a lot of times I work with people… The most of the people I work with are lawyers at big law firms and they tended to be the people who did very, very well academically. I firmly believe that there are a lot of different ways to be smart. And most of these people are smart in the traditional academic sense.

Dr. Hallowell:
Right.

Lauren Krasnow:
And they have a lot invested in that emotionally and as a means of self identity. And I think because they’re surrounded by other people in the same [inaudible 00:05:15], there’s not a lot of checks and balances or questioning that goes on. And that’s why I do believe that working with a coach is very, very helpful because it’s somebody who can say, “Wait a minute. Did you notice that you just said this to yourself or did you notice that you just made this assumption?”

Lauren Krasnow:
And a lot of times the answer is no. I always tell the people that I work with, that I’m going to keep on calling them out and saying things like that. But my goal is that they get to the point where they’re able to do it for themselves. And most of them are. And I think it’s just something that we don’t even realize is as automatic as it is. And I say this as someone who lived it for many years and now somebody who gets to help other people identify that in themselves.

Dr. Hallowell:
You lived it as a perfectionist?

Lauren Krasnow:
Yeah. As a perfectionist for sure. Definitely. And when I was a lawyer and when I was in school, I would think, “This has to be perfect or else,” and as I’ve gotten older I’ve thought, “Why? It actually doesn’t have to be perfect.” And as a parent that’s been one of the biggest gifts is looking at my kids and saying, “They’re not perfect. Nobody’s perfect. And they’re still terrific.” And it’s a really liberating way to feel. But I think it’s very antithetical to the way a lot of us grow up and the way a lot of us are in our earlier younger professional days.

Dr. Hallowell:
Particularly the high achievers. How old are your children?

Lauren Krasnow:
I have a tween and a teen. And it’s funny. I’ve actually had this conversation with a number of friends and family members where I… “How much should your kid try?” And I said, “Well, if an A is a 90 or an A is a hundred and the kid’s goal is to get an A for whatever reason, let’s just say for college purposes or whatever. Do you want your kid to try to get the hundred or do you want your kid to try to get the 90?” And I think many people just assume that of course you would try to get the hundred. Why wouldn’t you?

Lauren Krasnow:
And I actually don’t believe that. I actually think that people are motivated by different things, figure out what you’re motivated by. And if there’s an intrinsic motivation that is encouraging the person to want to learn more or whatever, that’s great. And I’m not advocating slackerism exactly but I am saying, I work a lot with people now who 20, 30 years after they graduated from school are still trying to get the hundred and they don’t need to. And I say, “Why? Why are you doing that?” And they don’t really know, except that it’s a habit.

Dr. Hallowell:
Right. It’s the success cure that you… If you can pile up enough A’s then [inaudible 00:07:55] or other you’re all that. And I gave a talk some years ago at my high school. I went to a prep school in New Hampshire called Exeter Phillips Exeter and a very rigorous school where everyone is competing and wanting to go to Ivy league colleges and whatnot. And so, I gave a talk to the student body and I said what you really should do during your high school years is fall in love with a person, with a project, with an activity, with a piece of music, with a blade of grass. But the most important thing you can do here at Exeter or any high school is fall in love because that’s sustainable. A’s fade into distant nothingness but falling in love, that leads to getting an A, that sustains itself. And I think oftentimes kids, they need to hear from people like you and me to give them permission not to be seduced by the success cure, by the glitter of the A’s and what they think that might be.

Lauren Krasnow:
I love that. I love the concept of falling in love and I really believe that for two reasons actually. First I believe falling in love, generally paradoxically leads to whatever measure of success because when people do things that they’re passionate about that’s when they tend to be the best [crosstalk 00:09:24]-

Dr. Hallowell:
Exactly.

Lauren Krasnow:
… in the world of ADHD, hyper-focus et cetera. But I also think, and I learned this from you when I studied under you, is I believe all of us have our super powers. We all have our gifts. And if we’re sitting there trying to eke out some level of perfectionism, when good enough would have been fine, the energy and the time and the attention that we would have spent going from good enough to perfect is diverted. And from us doing something that I believe we could really use our, I don’t know, I hope this doesn’t sound cheesy, but purpose. Something that is really meaningful to us and something where we could have a really big impact on ourselves and on other people and on the world.

Dr. Hallowell:
Yes.

Lauren Krasnow:
And I always think people who are in the throws of perfectionism sometimes forget to look at the opportunity cost of, “What am I giving up by working so hard to get from the 90 to 100? And is it actually something that I’m choosing with intention or is it just something that I’m doing either based on fear or based on an automatic habit?”

Dr. Hallowell:
Yeah, absolutely. You reached a branch point in your life when you were a lawyer at a big firm and then you decided to go in a different direction. What was that all about?

Lauren Krasnow:
So, I really liked being a lawyer but I didn’t love it. And I think I always had this feeling that I was doing something that I wasn’t meant to be doing. And I don’t know if everybody feels this way. I think a lot of people have these feelings, I’ll call them intuition, and they ignore them. And there’s all sorts of reasons we ignore them. For convenience, maybe you’re attached to a certain income or you’re attached to a certain prestige or status, or you’re trying to impress a family member, quite often a parent. And looking at what that means to give all of that up is terrifying.

Lauren Krasnow:
And I think it’s really hard for people to come to terms with that. But the flip side is if you go along and are led by what I call a fear-based decision instead of a conscious intention and you wake up and you sometimes wonder, “What did I do? Was this the right thing for me?” And I don’t know that I believe that every single person has to be madly in love with their job. I think there’s a lot of hobbies and a lot of other things that people can do that can give them that of satisfaction. But I really, I do encourage certainly everybody who I coach, I encourage them to really think about designing their lives to be intentional so that the choices are born of a conscious intention as opposed to just default happening.

Dr. Hallowell:
And how do you help people who are holding back out of fear?

Lauren Krasnow:
I think like many coaches, I really help them look at the fear and own it. And I think a lot of people because they’re in this world where they’re surrounded by other people who are doing the same thing that they’re doing and frankly maybe also driven by fear, I think a lot of people are in that practice and asking themselves, “What do I want?’ They think, “What should I do instead?” And I say this as somebody who used to be one of those people.

Lauren Krasnow:
And one of the very, very first things I do as a coach is if I hear this right away, I say, “Can we come up with an agreement? Do you mind if I call you out every time I hear you say the word ‘should’? ‘I shouldn’t do this,’ or, ‘I have to do this.’ And they say, “Fine,” and we make it a game and we make it fun. But I’m very, very vigilant about observing that and recognizing it. And a lot of times people are very, very surprised because I think a lot of times we don’t realize what we say to ourselves and hearing it can be the first step into saying, “Is this something that I actually want or is this something that I want to change?”

Dr. Hallowell:
So, let me give you a… Not a hypothetical, a real example. Patient of mine in New York a few years ago, working for a well-known investment banking firm. He said, “I begin my mornings meeting with the three other guys for coffee. And each one of us starts our day by saying, “Will any of us have the nerve to quit today?” and we never do. But there he’s held hostage or he holds himself hostage because he can’t imagine giving up the six figure salary and the bonus that comes with it. How would you advise him? How would you approach him?

Lauren Krasnow:
Well, I think first we would spend some time unpacking what is the fear about and a lot of times it’s just fear of the unknown. And then I believe that there are sometimes… This is not me coming up with this framework that I’m about to share, it’s actually Stephen Covey. But the framework of scarcity versus abundance. And I think that is as tied into fear and fear versus conscious intention. I think if we believe that the universe is somehow going to provide for us and that things will work out and that we own our own power enough to make things happen, I think then we’re more willing to take risks.

Lauren Krasnow:
And I think if we don’t, then we’re more willing to stay in a place of fear and make decisions that come from a place of fear. And one of my favorite quotes is, “Where attention goes energy flows.”

Dr. Hallowell:
That’s great.

Lauren Krasnow:
And I believe that a lot of times when people are coming from a place of fear, they’re focusing all their attention on what they might lose and not enough attention on what good things might happen from taking a risk.

Dr. Hallowell:
And what if he says back to you, “But Lauren,” or, “Dr. Krasnow,” or whatever your folks call you, “I don’t have the talent. I don’t have the talent to go out on my own. I don’t have the talent to do what I’ve always wanted to do, which is start a marina,” let’s say, “And I don’t think I could do that. So, I’m better off staying here with my half million dollars a year and playing it safe.”

Lauren Krasnow:
Well, there’s two things that I would want to know. The first is, well, what are your talents? Let’s get granular and let’s look at what your talents are and how you could see yourself using them. And then just like any coach, I would say, “Well, what are the costs to you of staying in the status quo versus the benefits to you? And what would the costs and benefits be of an alternative course of action?” And I think people tend to be very gloss over the benefits of the alternative, very superficially, and they tend to talk about the cost very superficially. And I think really digging down deep sometimes gets people to say, “Wow maybe this cost is greater than I really acknowledged myself, or maybe the benefit would be greater. And maybe I really do have the talents to make this happen. I may be deficient in skills XYZ, but that doesn’t mean that I can’t get them or that I can’t hire somebody with a complimentary skill set, et cetera.”

Dr. Hallowell:
And you’re probably really underestimating your own talents because after all you wouldn’t have get… You wouldn’t have been hired at this high paying job at a New York investment ban, if you didn’t have a lot of talent. So, and the talent that you have can be transposed to the marina. You’re [crosstalk 00:17:00]-

Lauren Krasnow:
Absolutely. Thank you. That’s a great point. Absolutely.

Dr. Hallowell:
Yeah.

Lauren Krasnow:
One of the things I learned that actually, particularly when I took the course that I did with you, looking at your strengths in a different capacity. One of my favorite expressions is Einstein, “If you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, then it will spend its whole life thinking it’s stupid.” When in fact Einstein believes, as do I, that everybody has a genius. Everybody has genius in them.

Dr. Hallowell:
Yes, absolutely.

Lauren Krasnow:
And I think a lot of times people spend times measuring themselves against a certain situation without taking themselves out and saying, “Well, in a different context, this could be unbelievably powerful.”

Dr. Hallowell:
Exactly.

Lauren Krasnow:
And one of the gifts of my job is that I get to be on that journey with people as they do that and discover that, and then bring those gifts to bear for their own lives and the lives of others. And it’s so rewarding. It’s unbelievably rewarding.

Dr. Hallowell:
You’re not just with them, you’re setting them free. You’re helping them break what Blake called mind forged manacles. You’re helping them break free. And that’s a [crosstalk 00:18:05].

Lauren Krasnow:
They’re helping them break free. I’m asking questions that I’ve been trained and skilled and practiced to ask because of my background in training, but they do the work themselves and it’s so empowering to see somebody really live into their own greatness. I feel like I did it myself, not to say that… Not in an unhumble way, but in a way of example, that I believe that anybody can do this and everybody should do this because I think the world would be better if everybody were living their talents to the maximum effect.

Dr. Hallowell:
Yeah. You’re not saying it in a non humble way, you’re saying it in a celebratory way. You’re celebrating. You, “Look, I took this chance and it made all the difference,” and you’re celebrating. And I think you’re, by implication, exhorting other people to celebrate too. To make the changes that will turn their lives into a celebration.

Lauren Krasnow:
Yeah. Thank you. I love that. Looking at it as a celebration because I really genuinely believe that. I believe that everybody has power within them. And the only question is when they realize that and then decide what they’re going to do with that.

Dr. Hallowell:
Well, you wouldn’t be able to do as well as you do it if you didn’t really believe that, I think, anyway. Well, Lauren Krasnow, what a pleasure to have you on this podcast. I could talk to you for an hour but we’re not supposed to go that long.

Lauren Krasnow:
Yeah. Thank you so much. What a pleasure to be here. And I just want to give a shout out to you. You really have inspired me by encouraging me to think about my own strengths. And as I said, I’ve gone on to do that with other people and then as they go and become leaders, they do it for other people. So, I just will say, I think everybody… You never know what ripple effects your own stepping into your own strengths and greatness will have. So, I want to say thank you to you Dr. Hallowell.

Dr. Hallowell:
Thank you so, so very much. I really, really appreciate that. It means a lot to me. Well, if you’d like to learn more about Lauren… Now you tell me if I get this right, Lauren. Go to voltapeople.com. V-O-L, V as in Victor V-O-L-T-A people.com/Lauren-Krasnow-coaching. Did I get that right?

Lauren Krasnow:
You did. Thank you very much.

Dr. Hallowell:
Volta people.com/Lauren-Krasnow-coaching. You’re a tremendous resource and we’ll put a link to your site in the show notes. Please continue to reach out to us at [email protected] And like and follow Distraction on social media. Remember to subscribe to the podcast if you haven’t already so you never miss an episode. Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. The podcast is recorded and mixed by Scott Persson and produced by Sarah Guertin. I am Dr. Ned Hallowell thanking our very special guest Lauren Krasnow. Goodbye for now.

Dr. Hallowell:
The episode you just heard was sponsored by OmegaBrite CBD. Formulated by OmegaBrite wellness, creators of the number one Omega-3 supplements for the past 20 years. OmegaBrite CBD, safe, third party tested, and it works. Shop online at OmegaBritwellness.com.

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Ned’s Short List of Good Distractions

Ned’s Short List of Good Distractions

Pandemic-life these days can be quite stressful, so finding ways to give your brain a break is key to maintaining a healthy balance. Our host shares a few of the things he’s been doing to take his mind off of the pandemic, politics and other upsetting topics in this week’s mini Distraction.

Reach out to us with your comments, questions and show ideas! Send us an email, or record a voice memo on your phone and send it to [email protected]

Learn more about our sponsor, OmegaBrite CBD! Distraction listeners can SAVE 20% on their first order with the code: Podcast2020. Shop online at OmegaBriteWellness.com.

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin and our recording engineer/editor is Pat Keogh.

Check out this episode!

A transcript of this episode can be found below.


Dr. Ned Hallowell:

This episode of Distraction is sponsored by OmegaBrite CBD, formulated by OmegaBrite Wellness, creators of the number one Omega3 supplements for the past 20 years. OmegaBrite CBD, safe, third-party tested, and it works. Shop online at omegabritewellness.com.

This is Dr. Ned Hallowell with a mini episode of Distraction. During the pandemic, each week, we do a mini episode that touches in some way upon this phenomenon that we’ve all been living within and today’s is going to be a lighthearted one. I want to talk about things that I have been doing myself to divert me from the perils of the day, to take my mind off of the pandemic, politics and other upsetting topics. I just thought I’d go down the list of what I’ve done either alone or with family members, not an exhaustive list, of course, but just a few things that came trippingly to my tongue or instantly to my mind.

One thing, I have been binge watching Schitt’s Creek. Now, if you’ve never seen Schitt’s Creek, it is funny. I really recommend it to you. My wife started watching it and she described it to me and I said, “I don’t think that sounds good.” It is terrific. It is uproariously funny. It is so, so, so, so funny. If you don’t find the show funny, something’s happened to your funny bone. Just thinking about it, with Eugene Levy, with the big eyebrows, it’s just hysterically funny.

I also made a purchase while waiting in line because we have to wait in line to get into certain stores, and the line outside of Whole Foods happens to have a bunch of hanging flowers for sale. So I bought two of these hanging flower pots, one predominant color pink, the other predominant color violet, and I hung them from hooks on our front porch. Now, when you buy hanging flower pots, you have to water the flowers. So that’s what I’ve been doing each day, and in order to water the flowers, I’m not quite tall enough to reach the watering can up. So I bought a little step stool. So I have my step stool on the porch, along with my watering can and I get up there every day or every other day and water these flowers. I’m telling you, it’s really rewarding to see them flourish and grow and they’re bushier, and hanging downer more, and just lovely to behold.

Also, someone left us a pot of pansies as sort of a gift during this time and I’ve been watering that as well and they are just flourishing. My gosh, there were a few stray strands of pansy in the original. Now it’s just like a pansy bush. So we’ve got the blue pansies, the violet flowers, the pink flowers and the porch, it just lifts my spirits. I also wrote a letter to David Brooks, the columnist in the New York Times. He wrote a column on Friday, the 26th, about five problems that we’re dealing with that I just thought it was a wonderful column.

I’ve also been cooking. I go online and I look for recipes and there’s a gazillion recipes online. They’ll have 32 ways of turning ground meat into a meal or 17 side dishes for the 4th of July, and I love these and I go download them, I print them out and next thing you know, I’m cooking them up. Like tomorrow, I’m going to make a vegetable chicken stew in the crackpot. Tuesdays is my day to make dinner, so I’ll put it in in the morning, and by the time evening rolls around, we’ll have this yummy, delicious stew. Online recipe shopping is another activity that I highly recommend.

Play with a dog. We’re lucky because my daughter is here and with her comes her a little Chiweenie named Layla. As you know, I think dogs are God’s greatest creation. Been playing with Layla every chance I get. Then when my son brings over his dog, Max, we had to play with both dogs and out in the backyard, the two of them rushing around.

Then one final thing I got for my daughter, because she really wanted this, a inflatable pool, above ground obviously, that it’s big enough for her to put a inflatable raft in it so she can lie in the sun, in the water, on the water and to see the smile on her face, when this thing arrived. It didn’t cost a huge amount. It was $300. I know that’s not nothing, but it was affordable and it was joy, joy, joy, joy. This is all along the lines of specializing. That’s my term for making the ordinary extraordinary. Turning what’s a dismal situation into one that’s a playful, fun, rewarding, interesting, engaging.

So that’s my little list. Binge-watched Schitt’s Creek, water the hanging flowers, write a letter to David Brooks, cook up new stuff, play with the dog and get something special for your daughter, in my case, it was this inflatable pool. Let’s try to do these things for one another. Let’s try to stay connected, even though we have to keep our distance. Let’s try to bring each other messages and vibes of goodwill, of joy, of understanding, of harmony. Let’s try to get along.

Okay, before I say goodbye, I’d like to remind you to check out OmegaBrite CBD. I’ve been taking the CBD supplement myself for nearly three months and I have noticed it’s definitely helping with my feelings of irritability and random anxiety. You can get OmegaBrite CBD online at omegabritewellness.com. That’s O-M-E-G-A-B-R-I-T-E-wellness.com, Brite intentionally misspelled. They have a deal for Distraction listeners right now as well. You’ll save 20% off your first order when you use the promo code podcast 2020. That’s podcast 2020. OmegaBrite CBD, safe, third-party tested, and it works.

Please continue to connect with us. Share your thoughts, questions, and show ideas by emailing us at [email protected]. That’s [email protected] Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is the multi-talented and several voice levels, Sarah Guertin, and our recording engineer and editor is the impish and brilliant Pat Keogh. I am Dr. Ned Hallowell. Thank you so very much for joining our community and listening to our podcast.

The episode of Distraction you just heard was sponsored by OmegaBrite CBD formulated by OmegaBrite Wellness, creators of the number one Omega3 supplements for the past 20 years. OmegaBrite CBD, safe, third-party tested, and it works. Shop online at omegabritewellness.com.

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What You Tell Yourself Matters

What You Tell Yourself Matters

Changing your mindset can take a lot of work, but it is possible. Today’s guest grew up thinking he would never be good at math, and went on to write two textbooks on the subject! It’s all about what you tell yourself and what you’re willing to do. Listen as Dr. H talks with Steven Campbell about how your brain is always paying attention.

To learn more about Steven Campbell’s virtual workshop go to StevenRCampbell.teachable.com. Use the code COVID49 to pay just $49 (regularly $297) for a limited time.

Making the Mind Magnificent by Steven Campbell

Reach out to us! Send us an email or record a voice memo and send it to [email protected]

Learn more about our sponsor, OmegaBrite CBD! Distraction listeners can SAVE 20% on their first order with the code: Podcast2020. Shop online at OmegaBriteWellness.com.

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin and our recording engineer/editor is Pat Keogh.

Check out this episode!

A transcript of this episode can be found below.


Dr. Ned Hallowell:

This episode of Distraction is sponsored by OmegaBrite, formulated by OmegaBrite Wellness, creators of the number one Omega-3 supplements for the past 20 years. OmegaBrite CBD, safe, third-party tested, and it works. Shop online at OmegaBriteWellness.com.

Hello, and welcome to today’s episode of Distraction. I’m your host, Dr. Ned Hallowell. Last week, we released a mini-episode where I talked about little ways to make each day feel special. I hope you’ve been practicing your own ways of making each day feel special, as a way to counter some of the stress and anxiety that we’re all living through these days. My guest today is here to add a few ideas to that list. His name is Steven Campbell, and he has an MSIS, that was new to me, we looked it up, master of science in information systems, MSIS. And his resume includes professor, author, educational dean radio host, and professional speaker.

He conducts seminars around the world on the subject of changing what we say to ourselves about ourselves. Boy, that’s a big topic and he joins me today to help all of us thrive in this new normal. Thanks so much for joining me, Steven.

Steven Campbell:

Well, thank you so much for having me, Ned, I appreciate that this is going to be fun.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

So, just have at it. How can you help us talk to ourselves better about ourselves?

Steven Campbell:

Well, psychology has been doing some amazing things in the last 60 years. I really like to start with the ’60s because that’s where changes really began. That was really the beginning of cognitive psychology. And a little book came out back in 1961, called The Guide to Rational Living by Albert Ellis, he was one of the founders of cognitive psychology. In that book he suggested, because the research had not been done sufficiently as it is now, so what I’m going to be sharing with you has been researched for years all over the world, is that everything that we can do today is primarily based on what we say to ourself about ourself, today. Now, notice I’m emphasizing the word today, when he suggested this, in his little book, psychology had an absolute conniption fit, they said, “No, no, no, no, no, no, no.”

The way we are today is based in our childhood, and unresolved childhood conflicts, of course, that was Freudianism. That was followed by behaviorism, Dr. BF Skinner from Harvard, who said, “No, no, no. The way we are today, it’s all cause and effect.” That was followed by, “It’s all in your genes.” Which is wrong because we’re far more than our genes. That was followed by environmentalism, it’s in your environment, your birther, your mom, your dad. And Dr. Ellis came back and he said something really interesting, he said, “You know what? They’re all true.” Wait a minute. How could they all be true? Here’s the point, when you say it, your brain’s job is to make true.

So, I think one of the most exciting discoveries that psychology has made is that our brain believes what we tell it, without question, no arguments. So, when I give my presentations to people, I like to always give personal stories because that’s what makes it real. So, let me share a little story that illustrates this. For the first 42 years of my life, I said to myself, “I am really dumb at math.” And guess what? I was because that what I said to myself, I’d see numbers, I would freak out. But then in the ’70s I began discovering computers and I began tinkering around with computers and eventually got a graduate degree in computer science and began teaching computer courses. And one day the dean came in the office at this one university, he said, “One of our math professors just quit, so you are our new math professor.”

“No, I can’t.” He said, “Do you want a job? Learn. There’s the book. Next semester.” Well, I needed the job, Ned, so picked up all the books I could on brain-based learning from my library. And I taught my curriculum based on how the brain learns. And students began saying, “Oh my gosh, Mr. Campbell, you are such a good math teacher.” And then, the Dean said, “All the students saying, ‘I will only take math if Mr.Campbell’s my professor.'” And here’s what I began doing, Ned. I began listening to what they were saying to me rather than what I’ve been saying to myself for 42 years. And I began saying, “You know what? I’m really good at math. This is really fun. I’m having a good time with this.” And what did my brain say? “Oh, okay. Is it true? Don’t care. All I care is what you tell me. You say it. I believe it.”

And I began enjoying math so much I eventually ended up writing two college textbooks. In what do you think? Math and computer science. So, here’s the point, everything we can do today is primarily based on what we say to ourself about ourself, today. We can change what we are saying to ourself about ourself, when? Today. And what will our brain say? “Okay. Is it true Don’t care. All I care is what you tell me.” When I began learning that, things began changing in my life, in my wife’s life and then eventually in our daughter’s lives and in my students’ lives. So, the first point is that our brain believes what you tell it, which is scary and wonderful. The scary part is when you’d say, “Oh my gosh, I’m so dumb for doing this.” You know what our brain says to that?

“Okay. Yeah, you’re right. You really are.” And then what it does is it looks for other ways in which we did bad things and makes us feel dumb. But the wonderful part is when you say, “You know what, that was really dumb, but that doesn’t mean I’m dumb.” Brain says what? “Oh, okay.” And then it looks for ways in which I’m really intelligent. When I say, “I can do it.” The brain says, “Absolutely.” And it becomes obsessed with finding ways of doing it. So, the first principle is that we are in charge. Our brain’s listening to us. People say, “Well, what about what other people say to us?” Listen, what other people say to us do not become a part of our mindset until we agree with them.

I’m a first year Baby Boomer, born in 1947, I was taught that you have a self-image that you have to maintain and flourish and all that. It turns out that’s only partially true. It turns out that we now know that we have millions of self-images. You have a self-image for every single thing that you do. I have a self-image for every single thing that I do. So, I have a self-image of how I see myself as a father, as a husband, as a grandfather, as a teacher, as a singer, as all this. So, I have all these self-images. In fact, I have a self-image for every meal that I cook. So, I cook really good scrambled eggs and horrible poached eggs. What’s the point? Well, if I kept two self-images for just two meals that I cook, you can imagine how many self-images that you have. Some of them are really strong and others are not, but here’s the point. Those self-images are learned. You were not born with them.

Now, all of us were born with certain natural dispositions. I was born a natural teacher. I’ve always been a teacher. When I was a kid, I used to put rocks in my backyard to pretend that I was teaching them. I mean, I was a weird kid, but we all have these natural dispositions. I don’t know you too well, Ned, but you have these natural things that you just love doing. It’s just a natural thing. Now, you had to learn how to do it, but the learning wasn’t hard because it was what you were doing naturally. So, our self-images are learned. Now, here’s where it gets exciting. Our self-images are learned from our self-talk. Our self images are based on what we are saying to ourself about ourself, today. Now, why is that so scary? Because according to your Shad Helmstetter in his wonderful book, What We Say When We Talk to Ourself, most of what we say to ourself is negative.

Also, what we say to ourself, I call the negative crap, because our brain’s believing it. And here’s what’s scary, we keep saying it and our brain rewires itself, this is called neuroplasticity. There’s a wonderful book by Eric Kandel called In Search of Memory, which I highly recommend people read if they’re interested in this. Neuroplasticity is basically the fact that our brain rewires itself and it’s doing that right now. And so, when you give yourself messages like, “I’m really dumb.” The brain rewires itself and makes you dumb, but when you give yourself [inaudible 00:09:02] messages, the brain rewire itself, and those messages not only become a part of what you think, they become your mindset and then they become who you are.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Why do people say these negative things to themselves?

Steven Campbell:

It’s what we do. When people become aware of the negative stuff they’re telling themselves, they hold themselves back and they say, “Wait a minute. I don’t think so.” So, when I began saying to myself about the math stuff, “Wait a minute, I’m really smart in this.” The brain says, “Yes, you absolutely are.”

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Steven, Steven, come on, I have to just gently challenge a little bit here because nobody would want to be dumb at math. So, why would someone say, “I’m bad at math.”?

Steven Campbell:

I was bad at math is because of the way I was raised. It’s the way I thought about myself. I was raised in a family where I always just felt … I was raised feeling really, really dumb.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Okay. But if it were as simple as saying, “Oh, I’m really smart.” Then you on the spot become smart. I mean-

Steven Campbell:

Yes, it goes more than that.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Okay. Or to say, “Oh, I’m good at math.” Then we could just fire all the tutors and the special educators and just have a course in saying, “I’m good at math.” And suddenly everyone would be good at math.

Steven Campbell:

Yeah. As you noticed, it’s not that easy, but to start-

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Well, see, that’s what I’m saying. You make it sound as if it is. I mean, our brain believes what we say to ourselves, all we have to do is change what we say to ourselves and suddenly it’ll change?

Steven Campbell:

That’s where it starts. It starts with changing what we’re saying to ourself about ourself. Is it easy? Of course not.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Well, so that’s what I’m getting at. What makes it hard?

Steven Campbell:

Let me talk a little bit about self-image, a little bit more, I think that will answer your question. Our self-images are learned, which means they’re hardwired into our brain. They’re really, really hard to change because you’ve been saying these things to your life, some of these negative things all your life, and they’re hardwired in there.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

But Steven, you just said a little while ago, your brain believes what you tell it. Well, if that’s true, then why can’t you just tell it, “I’m good at math.” And on the spot become good at math.

Steven Campbell:

You can, but it’s going to fight you tooth and nail in the beginning.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

So, it doesn’t believe what you tell it, in other words?

Steven Campbell:

It does believe. But when I began teaching the math, I discovered that it was really fun. If I just said, “I’m good at math.” And stopped there, this never would have happened.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Okay. So, you had to do something, Steven, you had to do something to prove to yourself that you were good at math? It wasn’t enough just to say, “I’m good at math.”

Steven Campbell:

Oh, no. No.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Okay. So, that’s a far cry from what you said at first, at first you said, “Brain believes whatever you tell it.” But then as you tell your story, no, you had to prove to yourself you were good at math and then your brain believed it.

Steven Campbell:

Yes. Absolutely. But it had to start with a change of what I was saying to myself. If I had said to that professor, “I’m just dumb in math, I can’t do it.” It would have stopped there. I said, “No, I’ve got to teach this class.” And then, I began looking at how the brain thought and I began teaching the class. And that’s when I said, “This is really fun. I can do this.” And the more I did it, the more the math became easier and easier, and really fun, but it starts with what I was saying to myself. And then, when I began teaching it and my brain rewired itself, it became easier and easier.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

But I’m sorry, again, but I just have to push back a little bit. It didn’t start with what you were saying to yourself. It started by you’re accepting a challenge out of necessity because you needed the job.

Steven Campbell:

Yes.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Okay. So, you were still saying to yourself, “Holy bleep, I’m bad at math, but I got to get good at math. And how am I going to do that?” And then you set about accepting the challenge and lo and behold, you were much better than you had thought. So, you proved to yourself that, in fact, you had talent that you didn’t know you had.

Steven Campbell:

That’s right. That’s right. But it started with the decision to accept that challenge. I could have said, “I just can’t do it. I just cannot do it, and you got to get someone else.” Or it says, “You know what? I’ve got to do this and I’m going to.”

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Yeah. So, you have grit. You have the ability to dig in, even when you think you’re at a disadvantage.

Steven Campbell:

That’s right. But it began with that decision, “I’m going to do this, I’m doing this.” And then when I began doing it, I discovered it was really easy and really fun. Does that make sense?

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Yeah, it does, but I’m glad to get it clarified. So, you’re not saying it’s as easy as saying,” Oh, I’m good at math.” And then, suddenly your brain will believe that?

Steven Campbell:

No, because I had been saying that stuff to myself for 42 years. It was when I began teaching it and I began seeing the responses from the students that I began saying, “Wait a minute, this isn’t bad at all. I’m having a really good time with this.” And then, when I began realizing I could write a book on this, it all validated it. But in the beginning it was hard and I had to make that decision, “All right, I’m really stupid in math, but I need this job, so I’m going to accept the challenge.” And at first it was difficult, but it became easier and easier.

[SPONSOR BREAK]

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

All right. Well, if you’ve been listening to the podcast regularly, you probably know that I’ve been taking a new supplement for the past couple of months and it’s called OmegaBrite CBD. OmegaBrite CBD is created by the estimable Dr. Carol Locke and her wonderful company OmegaBrite Wellness, creators of the number one Omega-3 supplements for the past 20 years. Carol and her team have set the standards for purity, safety and efficacy in the wild world of CBD. And have brought the same commitment to excellence to their new CBD supplement. What does it help me with? Well, I am less anxious since starting to take it. I’m getting better sleep and I am more focused on what I really want to be doing. Shop OmegaBrite CBD online at omegabritewellness.com. Distraction listeners save 20% on their first order with the promo code PODCAST2020. This is Dr. Ned Hallowell. Strongly recommend you try OmegaBrite CBD.

[SPONSOR BREAK END]

Steven Campbell:

I guess, that’s the point that I’m trying to make here. That it starts with, oftentimes, a decision that I can do it. Does that make sense?

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Of course. I guess, the obvious question is why doesn’t everyone decide, “I can do it.”?

Steven Campbell:

Well, that’s a really good question and I don’t have the complete answer to that.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

It’s just it’s such an interesting question. I mean, when I was in the 12th grade, I wrote a three-page short story in September and I handed it in and my teacher handed it back with a note at the bottom that said, “Why don’t you turn this into a novel?”

Steven Campbell:

Oh my gosh.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

And I said, “I knew this was a tough school, but I didn’t know I had to write a novel.” Well, I didn’t have to. And I was the only one, I was the only student he challenged to do that. And he said, “You know it’ll have to be on your time and you won’t get any credit for it, but I think you ought to try and do it.” And for some reason, I took up the challenge. And by the end of the year, I’d written a novel and it won the English prize and it changed my life forever because what it did was it got me to prove to myself that I could do something that I would have thought was impossible. If you told me at the beginning of the year, “You’ll write a novel.” I would have said, “Yeah, sure, and I’ll fly to the moon.”

But, the genius of this teacher was laying down that challenge in such a way that I accepted it. And to me, that’s what great teaching is. It’s getting people to prove to themselves they can do more than they thought they could do. But it was where that impulse comes from to say yes to the challenge, as opposed to say no. Well, in your case, you say it came from necessity. You had to have the job. In my case, I don’t know where it came from because I certainly didn’t believe I could do it. I suppose it was the triumph of hope over experience.

Steven Campbell:

That story just illustrates everything I’ve been saying. It started with the suggestion from your teacher and you had to decide, “I’m going to write this novel.” And your brain said, “Yes, you can.” And more you wrote it, I bet the more you enjoyed it because you were saying to yourself, “You know what? This is working.”

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

No, it was always difficult. Writing is difficult. I can’t say it became easy, but it became magnetic. I looked forward to doing it, I suppose, in the way someone looks forward to going to the weight room or something. I looked forward to the pain because it was in the service of trying to create something good. Yeah.

Steven Campbell:

And what happened is your brain was rewiring itself and it became a writer. You became a writer. Yeah. And that’s what’s wonderful about this. So, here’s what I tell my audiences at the end of every presentation I make, I want to give you two new ways of thinking. One, when you do something really well, one, when you do something really badly and the first one is from Stanford University, back in 1975 called the Effort Effect. What they discovered is that most of us pass over our successes way too quickly, too lightly, for them to ever become a part of who we are. So, oftentimes when people say to us, “Good job, I’m so proud of you.” Oftentimes many of us, not all of us, but many of us say, “Oh, not really. Oh, that’s embarrassing. That’s egotistical. Thank you very much. I could have done a better job. I was part of a team.”

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Yes. It’s so true.

Steven Campbell:

“Well, no, no, not really.” Well, this comes back to the brain believes what you tell it. When you say, “No, no, no, really, not really.” The brain’s believing that, the brain says, “Yeah, you’re right, you’re right, you’re right, you’re right, you’re right.” So, what I tell people is this, “When people stop to say, ‘Good job.’ you look at them and you say, ‘Thank you for telling me that.'” And then you wallow in your success like a pig in slop. I love the work of Dr. E.P. Seligman out of University of Pennsylvania, who was one of the authors of Positive Psychology. I taught this to around 300 Kaiser physicians, a number of years ago, down in Los Angeles. And when I said, “Wallow in your success.” The whole audience just broke up and laughed at the thought of that, but they loved what I was saying. They just loved it.

And when I was driving back to LAX, I was so excited I almost drove off the freeway. And so, I stopped by a Chevron, got a tuna sandwich and a Coke, and looked at myself in there. I was alone in my little rental car. I said to myself, I said, “You are the most amazing speaker.”

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

So, in some ways, you’re repositioning Norman Vincent Peale.

Steven Campbell:

Yes.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

It’s the power of positive thinking.

Steven Campbell:

That’s right.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

What you’re saying is absolutely true. It’s just, I think the hard part for most people, the brain is a tough sell. I disagree with you-

Steven Campbell:

Yes, it is.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

… that your brain believes what you tell it. You have to really persist in telling it, but if you do, it’s a really worthwhile effort because you can change from being someone who completely doubts everything you do, to someone who has confidence.

Steven Campbell:

Absolutely. I have a wonderful virtual workshop that I’m doing, that I’m offering at a tremendous discount. It’s normally $297, I’m offering it for a $248 discount. It’s what I call my COVID discount. And it is nine separate presentations, including a workbook that you can watch anytime you want to. And the website address is stevenrcampbell.teachable.com.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

So, stevenrcapmbell.teachable.com.

Steven Campbell:

Yes. And go on there and write the discount code COVID49 and that will give you a $248 discount. So, the end price is $49.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

And what is in the workshop?

Steven Campbell:

Workshop is basically the contents of my book. And it’s nine sessions that covers everything from self-images to goals, to affirmations, to why affirmations do not work, to affirmations why they can work and then it gets into feelings. So, it goes into all of it and people have really enjoyed it. And then, my book, Making Your Mind Magnificent, is on Amazon.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Wonderful. Well, you’re a very wonderfully accomplished and wise man. I really appreciate your joining us. So, thank you so much to Steven Campbell for joining us and to learn more about his virtual workshop, Flourishing in These Unprecedented Times, go to stevenrcampbell.teachable.com, enter the code COVID49, or get his book, Making Your Mind Magnificent. And remember, please, to reach out to us. We love hearing from you. Send a voice memo or an email to [email protected] That’s [email protected].

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is the wonderful Sarah Guertin and our recording engineer and editor is the irrepressibly delightful and brilliant Pat Keogh. This is Dr. Ned Hallowell saying goodbye for today.

The episode of Distraction you just heard was sponsored by OmegaBrite CBD formulated by OmegaBrite Wellness, creators of the number one Omega-3 supplements for the past 20 years. OmegaBrite CBD, safe, third-party tested, and it works. Shop online at omegabritewellness.com.

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Tools to Help You Stay Calm

Tools to Help You Stay Calm

It’s more important than ever to take care of yourself mentally and physically. Dr. Carole Locke of OmegaBrite Wellness returns to Distraction to share the science behind how Omega-3s, melatonin, vitamin D, and CBD help to calm you at the cellular level, and why certain supplements strengthen your immune system and help you feel more in control.

To learn more about Omega-3s go to OmegaBrite.com.

To learn more about CBD, melatonin and vitamin D go to OmegaBriteWellness.com.

Reach out to us! Write an email, or record a message using the voice memo app on your phone and send it to [email protected]

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin (@sarahguertin) and our recording engineer/editor is Pat Keogh.

Learn more about our newest sponsor, OmegaBrite CBD! Dr. Hallowell takes the supplement every day because it’s safe, 3rd party tested, and it works. Shop OmegaBrite CBD online at OmegaBriteWellness.com.

Do you know a high school or college student with ADHD or other learning difference? Tell them about our sponsor, Landmark College, in Putney, Vermont. It’s the college of choice for students who learn differently. Find out more HERE.

Click HERE to read a transcript of this episode.

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Is There an ADHD and Alzheimer’s Connection? And Other Listener Questions

Is There an ADHD and Alzheimer’s Connection? And Other Listener Questions

Dr. Hallowell addresses listener questions regarding ADHD and balance; Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease; natural treatment remedies and vitamin recommendations.

Thanks so much to our listeners Caroline, Anna, P.G. and Helen for sending in your questions!

Do you have a question or comment for Dr. Hallowell? Write an email or record a message using the voice memo app on your phone with your question and send it to [email protected]

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin (@sarahguertin) and our recording engineer/editor is Pat Keogh.

Learn about our sponsor, Landmark College, HERE.

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Give Yourself Permission To Be Real

Give Yourself Permission To Be Real

If you’ve spent any time on social media in the past few years, you’ve likely seen posts tagged with #happiness and #blessed as users share their lives. But is it for real or for show? Today’s guest, Monica Sweeney, offers a refreshing look at the path to finding happiness. Her bold and irreverent guided journals allow people to work through life’s ups and downs in a way that feels authentic and genuine, with a healthy dose of curse words to help them along the way. WARNING: This episode contains strong language.

Monica Sweeney’s journals include: Zen as F*ck, Let That Sh*t Go, Find Your F*cking Happy, and her latest work, Zen As F*ck at Work.

Reach out to us at [email protected].

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is @sarahguertin and our recording engineer/editor is Pat Keogh.

Do you know someone who learns differently? Our sponsor, Landmark College, might be the right place for them. Learn more HERE.

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Make New Year’s Hopes, Not Resolutions

Make New Year’s Hopes, Not Resolutions

Dr. Hallowell doesn’t think resolutions are a good idea, and instead suggests we think about our hopes for 2020. Listen as he advises all of us (including himself) on the right mindset for the new year and decade.

Happy New Year to all of our listeners! Thank you so much for being a part of the Distraction community. We truly could not do it without you!

Please reach out to us with your questions and show ideas! Record a voice memo or write an email and send it to [email protected]. Our producer is Sarah Guertin @sarahguertin, and our editor/recording engineer is Pat Keogh.

To learn more about how our sponsor, Landmark College, helps students with ADHD succeed click HERE. See their beautiful campus in Putney, Vermont at their next Open House on Friday, January 10, 2020.

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Special-ize Your World

Special-ize Your World

Ned shares his thoughts on being grateful not just for the good parts of life, but the bittersweet ones too, and why he thinks “special-izing” your world is super important!

Thank you so much to our Distraction community. We are grateful for you and wish you all a Happy Thanksgiving!

Please reach out to us with your questions and show ideas: [email protected]. Our producer is Sarah Guertin @sarahguertin, and our editor/recording engineer is Pat Keogh.

To learn more about how our sponsor, Landmark College, helps students with ADHD succeed click HERE.

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S2 Ep 42: Willpower Doesn’t Work

S2 Ep 42: Willpower Doesn’t Work

Benjamin Hardy believes people can change in both big and small ways, but not how they’ve traditionally been taught. He thinks that “you are who you are because of your environment.” If you want to change, Ben says, you need to change your environment. Listen as he talks about why this is true, how people always learn to adapt, even in the worst environments, and his new book that was just released today, Willpower Doesn’t Work: Discover the Hidden Keys to Success.

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Mini 34: 5 Tips for Clearing Out Your Mind

Our minds can easily be overrun these days with interruptions, obligations and general clutter. In this mini, Dr. Hallowell offers five quick tips for weeding out your mind and quieting all that noise. 

This episode’s sponsor is OmegaBrite, the premier natural advanced omega-3 formula for mind, heart, and joint health.

Explore OmegaBrite products and benefits at www.omegabrite.com

Check out this episode!

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Ep 30: This Special “Sleep” Yoga Helps You Find Focus

Dr. Hallowell celebrates ADHD Awareness Month with one of the best ways to quiet and relax the mind – yoga! Join the Distraction Podcast team in the yoga studio and learn about the benefits of Yoga Nidra, a guided sleep and relaxation practice that combats stress, tension, and over-stimulation. Whether you have ADD/ADHD or just want to train your mind and maintain focus, grab your yoga mat for this episode.

This episode’s sponsor is OmegaBrite. The premier natural advanced omega-3 formula for mind, heart, and joint health.
Explore OmegaBrite products and benefits at www.omegabrite.com

Learn more about Yoga Nidra at  www.freshyoga.com

 

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