Putting “Worry” in Perspective

With Distraction’s Mini-Episode 12 devoted to the topic of “worry,” here are some more thoughts from podcast host Dr. Hallowell excerpted from “Worry: Hope and Help for a Common Condition.”

While a healthy level of worry can help us perform efficiently at work, anticipate dangers and learn from past errors, excessive worry can make an otherwise sane person seem crazy, devoid of sound judgment, peace of mind and happiness. So how do you curb the anxiety associated with stress and toxic worry?

First, it helps to understand what I call the basic equation of worry. This is a good way to conceptualize where toxic worry comes from: Heightened Vulnerability + Lack of Control = Toxic Worry.

The more vulnerable you feel (regardless of how vulnerable you are) and the less control you feel you have (regardless of how much control you actually have), the more toxic your worrying will become. Therefore, any steps you can take to reduce your feelings of vulnerability and/or increase your feelings of control will serve to reduce your feelings of toxic worry.

But how do you stay out of the paralyzing grip of toxic worry? If you’re walking through a minefield, how do you not feel so afraid that you can’t take another step? You need a plan. When you have a plan, you can turn to the plan for guidance, which immediately makes you feel as if you are less vulnerable and more in control whether you are or not. So whether the danger you perceive stems from the poor economy, a concern about your children, or a mole on your forearm that you think might be melanoma, you need a method to keep your fear from running wild so you can systematically dismantle the problem and take control.

Here are some tips:

1. All worry is not bad. Identify all the things you worry about and separate out the toxic to your health worries from good worry. Good worry amounts to planning and problem solving. Toxic worry is unnecessary, repetitive, unproductive, paralyzing, and life-defeating.

2. Exercise at least every other day. It reduces the accumulated noise and helps relax you.

3. Repeat the mantra, “I’ll fix what I can and, then I’ll put the rest out of my mind,” when you feel anxious thoughts emerging.

4. Add structure to your life where you need it. Often disorganization, poor time management creates anxiety. To help get you on track and calm your stress, consider hiring an organization coach.

5. Reality–test your worry. Regain perspective. Share your worries with someone who should know if what you are worrying about makes sense or if you have exaggerated it. So many of our problems are the result of overactive imaginations.

6. Use humor. Make friends with amusing people, watch something funny. Humor restores perspective; toxic worry almost always entails a loss of perspective.

7. Get plenty of sleep. One good way to fall asleep naturally is to focus on counting your breaths. Inhale on 2-3 counts and exhale on 5-6 counts. This relaxes you and gives you something neutral to think about.

8. Avoid watching too much TV or reading too many newspapers and magazines.

9. Never worry alone. You often find solutions to a problem when you talk it out with someone. The mere fact of putting it into words takes it out of the threatening realm of the imagination and puts it into some concrete, manageable form.

10. Develop connectedness in as many ways as you can – with family, friends, organizations or nature. Take up a hobby that could get you involved in a local group – bird watching, cycling, walking etc. Consider volunteering for an organization that you care about.

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1 Comment

  • Sylvia Buet Posted November 13, 2016 11:45 am

    Very informative post about worry. If you want to read more about normal and abnormal worry, what does worry look like, the symptoms of generalised anxiety disorder and the cognitive treatment for excessive worry, please visit Worry and Anxiety UK

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