From Our ADHD Archives: Women and ADHD Q&A

From Our ADHD Archives: Women and ADHD Q&A

To help celebrate ADHD Awareness Month we’re re-releasing some of the most popular episodes from our first four seasons!

Women and girls with ADHD face a number of unique issues in dealing with their “race car brains.” In this episode from Season 2,  Terry Matlen, ACSW, who specializes in helping women with ADHD, joins Dr. Hallowell to answer questions from our female listeners. Topics include pregnancy and medication, hormones, exercise, toxic relationships, social isolation and much more.

Listen to the second part of this conversation: Women and ADHD Q&A Part 2

Other Links:

ADD Consults website

What Does Everybody Know That I Don’t? by Michele Novotni, PhD

The Queen of Distraction: How Women with ADHD Can Conquer Chaos, Find Focus, and Get More Done by Terry Matlen

Survival Tips for Women with ADHD by Terry Matlen

The Hallowell Center 

Do you have a question for Dr. Hallowell about ADHD, or a struggle you are facing? Write an email or record a voice memo with your thoughts and send it to [email protected]. We regularly release listener Q & A episodes!

Thanks to our sponsor, OmegaBrite Wellness! Distraction listeners, you can SAVE 20% on your first order with the promo code: Podcast2020 at OmegaBriteWellness.com.

And thank you to our other amazing sponsor, Landmark College in Putney, Vermont. Click HERE to learn more about our the college of choice for students who learn differently. (Dr. H has an honorary degree from Landmark!)

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin and our recording engineer/editor is Scott Persson.

Check out this episode!

A transcript of this episode is below.


Dr. Ned Hallowell:
This episode of Distraction is sponsored by Omega bright CBD formulated by Omega Brite, wellness, creators of the number one omega-3 supplements for the past 20 years. Shop [email protected] That’s B R I T E omegabritewellness.com. And by landmark college offering comprehensive support for students with ADHD and other learning differences. It is the college of choice for students who learn differently. And I have an honorary degree from that college. Learn more at lcdistraction.org

Terry Matlen:
With the right treatment, your life can change. I know that mine changed when I was diagnosed and treated, to such an extreme that that’s why I wanted to be out there helping other women. I can see how quickly and how wonderfully women can improve their lives.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Hello, this is dr. Ned Hallowell for the podcast Distraction. Today, we’re going to devote the episode to women and ADHD. And when I first learned about what was then called ADD in 1981, I was taught that the ratio of males to females was 10 to one. 10 males for every one female. That’s because we weren’t catching onto the fact that girls and women usually don’t have hyperactivity, aren’t disruptive. Quite the contrary. They’re the quiet daydreamer sitting in the back of the room, staring out the window. And they were passed over or dismissed as not very bright or maybe depressed, but they didn’t get their ADHD diagnosed.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Well, thankfully that has changed in the ensuing however many years is 1981 ago. And one of the leaders in the field today of helping women with ADHD is my long time friend, Terry Matlen. One of the kindest women you’ll ever meet, as well as one of the smartest. She’s, by training, an MSW social worker. And she’s also a psychotherapist, a writer, a coach, a consultant. Her books, plural, the Queen of Distraction and Survival Tips for Women with ADHD, I recommend very highly.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
So we are really lucky to have Terry with us today. And we received a bunch of questions from our listeners. And thank you by the way, for writing in with your questions. All right, with that introduction, let me bring Terry onto the line and welcome Terry.

Terry Matlen:
Hello Ned. Thank you so much for inviting me to your very popular podcast. I’m thrilled to be here.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
It’s wonderful, wonderful to have you. So how did you get into this line of work? How did a nice girl like you find yourself in a place like this?

Terry Matlen:
Well, I have two daughters and my youngest daughter was diagnosed with ADHD at a very young age. Her story is pretty unique, so I’m not going to get into it, but it’s not the typical story of she was born with ADHD, she had trouble with school, and then all that sort of thing. But suffice it to say that in trying to help her, oh I’d say from the time she was about four, I was learning about ADHD and kids. How can I help? Here I am, a social worker. How do I help this kid who was totally out of control with severe hyperactivity and impulsivity? So along the way is I was reading and reading and reading. In those days, as you know, Ned, this would be early 1990s, there weren’t a lot of books out on ADHD in kids, let alone ADHD in adults.

Terry Matlen:
So I was reading and somehow I came across a book, the only book in the early nineties, I believe, that was out there. And then I read that, and came across your book, which has changed millions of people, which changed my life dramatically. So that’s Driven to Distraction. And reading your book, I’m not quite sure why he picked it up because it was really more about adults, and I didn’t even think I might have ADHD. I just thought I was quirky, that I couldn’t get my life together. Maybe it was because I had two very active kids, one with the ADHD, but your book really changed my life.

Terry Matlen:
And so I read more, as the years went on, more books came out, but yours really is the bible. And then I got evaluated by a local psychologist who happened to specialize in ADHD in adults. And when I was diagnosed and treated for my ADHD, this was back, gosh, over 20, over 25 years ago, I saw how much it changed my life for the better. I never went through the stages that we talk about that many with ADHD do go through with things like grief and loss and anger and all those sorts of things. I took it and I ran with it because of how positive it was for my life. And when I saw how wonderful my life became, well, not bed of roses wonderful, but it changed significantly. I wanted to help other adults with ADHD and that’s how I landed in the field of ADHD.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Well, thank goodness you did. And then you wrote the books, and then you have a very robust online presence as well.

Terry Matlen:
Yeah, what happened was I got involved, even before the books were written, I got involved with nonprofit organizations like CHADD and Addup and I was very active on their boards. So what happened was people were emailing me from all over the world. And I thought, well, how can I help people who are in Africa or Sweden and Canada, US? So I took everything online and started my website at addcounsults.com. But still I needed more outreach, because I wasn’t giving people what they needed. And because of my passion like yours, I was thinking, what else can I do? What else can I do? Not much of a podcast kind of person. So I started a bunch of groups on Facebook, because Facebook had gotten extremely popular. And I focus more of my work for women with ADHD, so I have one group on Facebook for women that has over 22,000 members. So I really have taken to social media because I think that’s one way that a lot of people can find what you call vitamin C connection online.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Right. If someone wants to look into those, how do they do it?

Terry Matlen:
If they want to get to the women’s group, Facebook, the URL is facebook.com/groups/womenwithadd. And if that gets to be too confusing, folks can just email me and I can send them in the right direction. My email address is Terry T E R R Y at addconsults.com.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
And that’ll take them to your groups?

Terry Matlen:
That’ll take them to that group. I have another group for specifically, for moms with ADD.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Ah, what’s that one?

Terry Matlen:
I don’t have that one in front of me, but I have all kinds of Facebook groups to cover a lot of my bases. I have one for, let’s say for professionals who have ADD, they have their own group of problems that they feel misunderstood. So there’s all kinds of Facebook groups that I run, but this one is the biggest, the one for women. It’s just gone crazy. I’ve gotten about between 25 and a hundred people a day who were trying to join.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
What happens you? So you’re in the group. How does it work?

Terry Matlen:
Well, it’s like a support group. I don’t spend a lot of time in the group. I have a large group of volunteers who moderate things to make sure everything stays calm, because imagine being in a room with 22,000 with ADD, I can’t quite handle it myself.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
So do people just post comments?

Terry Matlen:
Yeah they post comments. A lot of it has to do with have you experienced this? Am I the only one who can’t handle a conversation at a party? And then other women will jump in and say no, you’re not the only one I have the same problem. So what it does is it validates people’s experiences.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
That’s wonderful. So it’s become a successful business for you.

Terry Matlen:
Yeah. And that’s been a really great outcome of embracing my ADHD. And I think that’s an important message for not just women, but men and women, that you get to a stage, hopefully, in your journey with your ADHD that you can embrace it and take it and run, and use the qualities that are positive and use them to your advantage.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Tim Armstrong, have you ever heard of the company called Oath?

Terry Matlen:
No.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Okay. Oath is the result of the merger of Verizon, AOL, and Yahoo.

Terry Matlen:
Oh, okay.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
So those huge companies merged into one called Oath, and Tim Armstrong is their CEO. And he and I have become friends because. He and his wife and I have become friends because Tim has big time ADD. And he’s very proud of it, very open about it. And he is committed to funding and making a documentary with me and his wife based on just what you were saying, the strength-based approach. That you’ll get the best outcome if you own it, embrace it, and manage it, as opposed to hiding it, and we all know the terrible outcomes that can result if you don’t take it seriously. But Tim is, is going to make this wonderful documentary and I think, Terry, it’s a real chance for finally the cloud of stigma to be blown away. And some people misunderstand what people like you and me are saying. We’re not saying ADD can’t be a severe problem. It sure can. It can be horrible. Lives can be ruined. But at the same time, if you learn how to manage it right, it can turn into a tremendous asset.

Terry Matlen:
Well, that’s what it did for me. I Learned what I’m good at. I learned what I’m not good at. I learned to use what I call accommodations, just like we use for kids in school who have special needs in a learning environment. And I bring that into the adult stage of, well, you have a problem with keeping your house together, you have a problem getting your work done at your job. And then you bring in an accommodation, and I emphasize that it’s not a luxury. It’s not a luxury to say have some cleaning crew come into your home, because it might take you 10 days to do what a cleaning crew can do in one hour. And a lot of women feel absolutely horrible about asking for that kind of help. When I reframe it as no, it’s not a weakness at all.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Anymore than eyeglasses are a weakness.

Terry Matlen:
Exactly.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
So it’s smart. It’s called working smart instead of just working hard. Well, we’ve received a bunch of questions from our listeners and I thought rather than me answering them, it would be really nice for you to answer them. But before that, we want to take just a moment to hear from our wonderful sponsor Landmark College.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
You know, when I was growing up, there weren’t many options for students like me, students who learn differently. Basically we had two diagnoses, smart and stupid, and one treatment plan, try harder. And they’d get you to try harder by punishing you and shaming you. It was, it was a pretty primitive system.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Having ADD and dyslexia, which didn’t have names back then, it made learning a challenge. But as I’ve mentioned on the show before, I was lucky. I had a first grade teacher by the name of Mrs. Eldridge, whom I’ve talked about many times, who helped me simply by putting her arm around me. She didn’t excuse me from reading, but she made a classroom experience without fear, without shame. It was okay to be who I was. I may never have learned how to read where it not for Mrs. Eldridge. I’m still a very slow reader. I have dyslexia, but I’m not the least bit ashamed of it. I majored in English at Harvard and did pre-med. So I’m a slow reader. So what? I can read, that’s what matters.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
And that’s one of the things I love about the sponsor of our show, Landmark College in Putney, Vermont. It’s a college full of teachers like my dear old Mrs. Eldritch. They uncover how each student learns best, and then they create an environment to help that student succeed. They truly do teach differently. For those of us who learn differently, we need that. And I couldn’t recommend this school more highly for students with ADHD, ASD, other learning differences, or really any kind of brain.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
To learn more about Landmark College, go to lcdistraction.org. That’s lcdistraction.org. And now back to the show.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Okay. So I’m here with my wonderful friend, the expert on ADD, Terry Matlen. And we’re about to answer some questions from our listeners. And again, thank you so much for sending these questions to us about women and ADHD, or as Terry and I still call it, ADD. Our producer, Sarah Guertin is in the studio with me now, and she’s here to read the questions we received from listeners. Terry, are you ready?

Terry Matlen:
I’m ready.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
All right, let’s go to our first question.

Sarah Guertin:
Okay. Hello everyone. This first question we got comes from Lauren C in Maryland, and she writes, I am 31 years old and was diagnosed with ADD and anxiety at the end of last year, after struggling, primarily with activation and focus my whole life. Since the diagnosis, I’ve been on Adderall and Zoloft. They are working really well. And I am seeing an ADHD coach to improve on habits the medication hasn’t resolved. My question is this, my husband and I are interested in conceiving this year, and I am most concerned about stopping my stimulant medication while pregnant. My main concern is that I will have to endure a year or so of distraction during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Do you have any suggestions for supplements or other medications for ADD that are safe for mom and baby?

Terry Matlen:
Well, I’m going to answer part of it, but I’m going to also defer to Ned because he’s the MD on this team. First of all, a lot of women find that during their pregnancy, their add symptoms improve, and that has to do with the estrogen levels changing, and Ned, you might be able to explain why that is.

Terry Matlen:
But before that, a couple of tips to help you Lauren from Maryland, is to consider exercise. I know that you’ll have to check with your doctor to see what kind of exercise will be beneficial and what will be safe for you during your pregnancy, because obviously towards the end, you’ll want to be careful with that. But there are studies out that show that exercise can be extremely helpful in taming ADHD symptoms. So I know that swimming, a lot of women say that swimming has been extremely helpful with their ADD symptoms and safe for their months in their pregnancy.

Terry Matlen:
Also prenatal yoga classes. They’re out there now. They’re all over the place, and that can help with your focus and calming you down. If you have the hyperactive impulsive component to your ADD, that’s an excellent option for you.

Terry Matlen:
I’ve heard things about neurofeedback, Dr. Hallowell can probably address that better than I can. What I found just in general is meditation. Meditation can calm your mind, so that would be something to look into during the pregnancy. There are brain training courses that will be safe for you during your pregnancy. Again, Ned, I think you can address that better than me.

Terry Matlen:
And you mentioned in your question that you’re working with a coach and I say bravo. That would be a huge help, not only throughout your pregnancy, but now and after you have your child, because we find that working with an ADD coach is like working with a second brain. They help us with the executive functioning that we often lack as adults with ADHD. So I would hope that you continue working with your coach to help you get through some of these things.

Terry Matlen:
Also, maybe working with a CBT, cognitive behavioral therapist. They often can help you with some of the aspects of living with ADHD that can be problematic. So I think those are some of the main things that I think that help you, but also keep it in mind that you may find that while you’re pregnant that your symptoms may actually improve.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Yeah. Just to reinforce that a pregnancy is a good treatment for ADD, so you may not miss your medications much at all. I would advise you not to take any medications during pregnancy at all. As for supplements, obviously talk to your doctor, but fish oil is a real good one. We like Omega-Brite, the best O M E G A hyphen B R I T E, ordered online. Fish oil is a real good supplement, but talk to your doctor before you ingest anything. And I would stay off the ADD meds and pregnancy may take care of it.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
And absolutely echo what Terry said about meditation, physical exercise, yoga. Coaching is absolutely wonderful, whether you’re pregnant or not. But if you work with that coach. The brain training stuff, I don’t think we’re there yet. The best way is just to use your brain, with stimulating conversations, reading a book, crossword puzzles. And neurofeedback, for ADD, I don’t think we’re quite there yet, either. For trauma, yes. Bessel van der Kolk is a big proponent of neurofeedback for trauma. But I think the ones that Terry ticked off are plenty and enough.

Sarah Guertin:
Okay. Now here are two questions from two different listeners, but they kind of go together. Is there any evidence on how hormone changes impact the symptoms of ADHD? For example, many young women take hormonal birth control. Could this cause problems with our ADHD symptoms and or stimulant medication? Regards, Monique. And then Jane asked, I read that the effect of ADD on a woman may change with hormonal changes, such as puberty or, later, menopause. I heard that it could help to have your hormone levels tested, if like me you’re in your late thirties or forties. Do you think there is a hormonal element?

Terry Matlen:
Absolutely. In the work I do, which is probably 99% with women, this is what I’m hearing from puberty on to post-menopausal stages of life. Hormones have a huge, huge effect on symptoms in women. And I think that we’re not doing enough work in explaining this to women, because they’re coming to me distraught at these different areas, different times in their lives of why am I getting worse? Am I developing Alzheimer’s? These are the perimenopausal, post-menopausal women. And even in the younger women, going through puberty, there’s a change in hormones, obviously with that. And because of these changes in hormones, we see an increase in ADHD symptoms.

Terry Matlen:
So we first need to really learn about this, and there’s literature online. Actually, I have a chapter in my book on hormones and women with ADHD. It’s very important to understand yourself. So during all these phases of life, you’ll see a change, often for the worse, I hate to say it. But not every woman has a terrible time with hormonal changes, but we do see fluctuation in how they affect symptomology.

Terry Matlen:
So one thing that I would recommend, even though it wasn’t really asked, but I’m going to offer it anyway, is to start a journal. When do you feel best? When do you feel worse? Is it two weeks before your period? Is it during your period? Is it as you’re entering perimenopause when your estrogen levels drop? Is it certain times during your pregnancy that we kind of alluded to? It’s to really start tracking this down and taking this information to your psychiatrist, but also to your OBGYN, because there are ways to help you during these times in your life when you are struggling.

Terry Matlen:
So absolutely these changes in hormones will often affect how you manage your ADHD, but there are ways to work with it for some women. And again, Ned can address this better than me. For some women that might be adding a anti-anxiety or anti-depression medications during times of change. It can be hormone replacement. Dr. Patricia Quinn talks a lot about using hormone treatment, especially during menopause, perimenopause, to help with some of the cognitive changes.

Terry Matlen:
I get emails all the time from women who really do think they’re losing it, that they’re developing dementia at 40, 45, 50. And we know that statistically, that’s probably not the case, that it’s more likely the ADHD that is affecting you because of the changes in your estrogen levels. So absolutely. It’s a great question. It’s something that women really do need to better understand so that they can take proactive action in helping themselves. So Ned, if you have some more specifics about…

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
No, no, you covered it very well, Terry. Absolutely work with OBGYN, internal medicine, endocrinology, take the hormones seriously and make the proper adjustments.

Sarah Guertin:
The next question. Does it appear that women with ADHD are more isolated socially regardless of treatment? Growing up, I was the only girl I knew diagnosed and I was more tolerated than accepted. That carried into adulthood, and I was in my thirties before I met another woman with ADHD. I find now that the more I open up about it, the more ADHD women I find. Thank you, Sabrina.

Terry Matlen:
Hi Sabrina. If you’re listening to this, your story is not the only story that I’ve heard like this. And I think there’s a number of reasons why women with ADHD feel more socially isolated regardless of treatment. And I think it has partly to do with how girls grow up. And this is from the work from Sari Solden, that is a colleague of Ned’s and mine. And she talks about how girls are taught very, very early on what society’s expectations are of girls and women in this world, whether you have ADHD or not. But we’re taught that we’re supposed to carry a lot of responsibility for keeping the family together, putting meals on the table, having holiday dinners and just making the doctor and dental appointments for our kids. It’s really holding the family together.

Terry Matlen:
I think that’s changed a bit and men are definitely taking on more of the responsibility, but I think girls are still taught from the time they’re little by their mothers, and even in ways that we’re not aware of through media, that this is how girls behave. This is how girls carry on as adult women. So if you feel that you’re falling short because you have an ADHD brain and you’re 30 years old and you just can’t juggle all of these responsibilities, what’s going to happen is you’re often going to feel like you’re different, that you’re out of step, that there’s something wrong with you. There’s something off. And that of course can lead into symptoms of depression and anxiety, and even substance abuse.

Terry Matlen:
So this feeling socially isolated, I think comes from a long history of girls hearing this message and then feeling that they don’t measure up. Because we’re constantly comparing ourselves to our sisters, our mothers, our neighbors, our girlfriends who may have it more together because they don’t have the challenge of living with this ADHD brain.

Terry Matlen:
So I think it really comes from a very early experience that just continues. And especially if you’re late in getting diagnosed and late in getting treatment, that can just be a huge part of your life. And that, again, can change with the right treatment. Your life can change. I know that mine changed when I was diagnosed and treated to such an extreme that that’s why I wanted to be out there helping other women. I can see how quickly and how wonderfully women can improve their lives, so it’s not a lost cause.

Terry Matlen:
There’s another piece to this that I think that’s important. And that is a lot of women and men, it’s not dependent on your gender, have problems with social situations. We don’t always read social things appropriately or correctly. There’s a number of reasons for that. And there’s ways to get help with that. So learning to listen in a more proactive ways can help with feeling more socially in tune with other people.

Terry Matlen:
There’s a really good book out there, Ned I don’t know if you’ve read it, Michelle, Dr. Michelle Novotni, another colleague of ours, wrote this book a number of years ago, but it’s still a fantastic book to read, and it’s titled What Does Everybody Know that I Don’t? And she specifically gets into this feeling of being out of step and how you can relate better to people around you. And once you learn some of these tricks or whatever you want to call them, then you’ll find that you’re not as socially isolated because now you have a toolbox of, well, how do I say hello to people? When do I stop talking? When do I start talking?

Terry Matlen:
And then lastly, it’s finding connections. Dr. Hallowell talks about this all the time, the vitamin C. And as we talked about earlier, finding groups of other women with ADHD so you can see that you’re not alone. And finding me on Facebook or wherever online, reading books and women with ADHD, going to conferences. We didn’t really mention CHADD and ADDA put on fabulous conferences where you can connect with women who have ADHD. And that was also life altering for me, when I found people like me losing things, dropping things, forgetting names after I just met someone, was just life-changing. So connection is the key.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
And go to facebook.com/groups/womenwithadd and you’ll get into Terry’s group of adult women who have ADD, and 20,000 members. You’ll get a lot of support, and a lot of knowledge and the vitamin connect, as I say, is the best, the best thing going, and now you can get it online again. facebook.com/groups/womenwithadd to join Terry’s group.

Sarah Guertin:
Okay. Here’s another question from Sabrina. Does it appear that women with ADHD have an increased risk of becoming involved in an either toxic or abusive relationship? Is this more attributable to the ADHD brain overthinking the reasons to justify abusive behavior? Or is it more societal norm driven? You mentioned during your how to ADHD interview last year, Dr. Hallowell, that we are attracted to train wrecks, she quotes, and after coming out of narcissistic abuse, I can not think of a possible bigger train wreck than an abuser.

Terry Matlen:
Well, I think that I love that quote. The being attracted to train wrecks is so true because the ADD brain is always searching for stimulation, stimuli, and being in an abusive relationship certainly does spark that part of our brain that is searching for the train wreck.

Terry Matlen:
But I think there’s more to it than that. I think it has to do with a lot of adults with ADHD have very poor self-esteem. So we might be attracted to people who may not be the healthiest match or us.

Terry Matlen:
If I’m losing my voice it’s because I’m here in Michigan where the weather keeps changing from 40 degrees to below zero. That’s a train wreck, if you want to enjoy that kind of abuse.

Terry Matlen:
But yeah, I think it’s a combination of looking for stimulation of the ADD brain, but also growing up with a feeling of a lack of self-esteem. If you’ve been in your own mind, you’re perceived as someone who has failed in many areas of your life, you haven’t gotten the right treatment, you haven’t gotten the right support. You haven’t had a great relationship perhaps with your parents, or your teachers in school, with peers. Then it kind of sets you up for continuing that type of behavior in your adult relationships the love, romantic relationships.

Terry Matlen:
So it’s something that needs to be broken. And the way to break that is to get the appropriate treatment, seeing a therapist who can walk through your life with you and look at the different things that you’ve done over a lifetime and how to break that, and working on your self-esteem, and talking about the things that you do well and, and focusing on that and putting your energy into the good stuff. So I think it is a combination of those two things.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
I’d add a third reason. Most people with ADD are remarkably intuitive and remarkably generous. And so they see into these train wrecks and believe they can help them and save them. And so they go ahead and do it, because they’re so generous. So it’s not a good idea. That’s one time where you want to hold back on your instinct to save. You probably do understand the person, but it usually does not work. It usually, when you become intimate with the train wreck, usually you get hurt. The other person doesn’t get saved.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
But I completely agree with Terry on the other two reasons, and to get a coach, a therapist, someone to help you put on the brakes, or get out of the relationship if you’re already in it, and find a healthy relationship, which is, really great when you do it. Well, my sincere thanks to Terry for joining me today. We’ll continue this conversation next time when we’ll answer more of the questions that you listeners have sent into us about women and ADHD. So Terry until next week.

Terry Matlen:
I am. So looking forward to continuing our conversation, Ned, on this very, very important topic. Thank you so much for having me as your guest.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Thank you.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Well, my sincere thanks to Terry for joining me today. We’ll continue this conversation next time, when we’ll answer more of the questions that you listeners have sent into us about women and ADHD. It’s so great to hear Terry’s thoughts and to hear her. I mean, you can just hear in her voice what a calming wise woman she is. It’s really fun for me to listen and know the knowledge she’s imparting comes wrapped in kindness and experience. If you’d like to learn more about Terry Matlen and her work, just click the link in the episode description, or go directly to her website, ADD consults that’s plural, addconsults.com.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Remember to like Distraction on social media. We’re trying to beef that up. And be sure to subscribe to the podcast wherever you listen so you never miss one of our lovely episodes. And please let us know how we could make them even better. I’m Dr. Ned Hallowell. Thank you so much for joining me. Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our recording engineer and editor is Scott Person. The wonderful Scott Person. And our producer is the also wonderful, talented Sarah Guertin. I’m Dr. Ned Hallowell saying goodbye for now.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
The episode you just heard was sponsored by Omega-Brite CBD, formulated by Omega-Brite Wellness, creators of the number one omega-3 supplements for the past 20 years. Shop online at omegabritewellness.com.

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