ADHD and… Driving, Divorces, and Daughters

ADHD and… Driving, Divorces, and Daughters

It’s one of Ned’s favorite things to do… respond to listener emails! Today’s questions have Dr. H discussing the real dangers of driving with ADHD, how to handle marriage troubles when your ADHD is getting all of the blame, why girls are under diagnosed, and medication tolerance.

If you have a question or comment you’d like to share, please write an email or record a voice memo (like Miles did in this episode!) and send it to [email protected].

Dr. Hallowell’s new book, ADHD 2.0, comes out January 12th. Pre-order Now!  Click here to pre-order your copy of ADHD 2.0.

Check out #NedTalks on TikTok! @drhallowell

Do you have a question or guest suggestion? Send an email with your thoughts to [email protected].

Thanks to our sponsor, OmegaBrite Wellness!

Now is a great time to try OmegaBrite as Ned has arranged for a special offer for the first 250 Distraction listeners who respond. Distraction listeners who buy one bottle of 70/10 MD Omega-3, will get a FREE bottle of CBD Full Spectrum 25mg Softgels with the promo code: NED. You’ll get FREE shipping too! These are the same supplements that Dr. H takes every day.

Just enter the code: NED after adding the Omega-3 to your cart and the FREE bottle of CBD and FREE shipping will be automatically applied.

Click HERE to learn more about our other amazing sponsor, Landmark College, in Putney, Vermont. It’s the college of choice for students who learn differently!

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin and our recording engineer/editor is Scott Persson.

Check out this episode!

A transcript of this episode is below.


Dr. Ned Hallowell:
This episode is sponsored by OmegaBrite wellness. Get a free bottle of OmegaBrite CBD Full Spectrum soft gels with free shipping when you buy one bottle of their 7010 MD Omega 3. Use offer code Ned. That’s my name, Ned, at omegabritewellness.com. Distraction is also sponsored by Landmark College in Putney, Vermont, the college of choice for students who learn differently. Learn more at lcdistraction.org.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Hello, and welcome to Distraction. I’m your host, Dr. Ned Hallowell. Thanks for joining us today. We have my favorite kind of show today, which is dealing with questions from all of you. As you hear these, please think of your own questions and send them in to us. We love doing these shows. As we normally do in these episodes, Sarah Guertin, our wonderful sturdy, steadfast, brilliant, et cetera, et cetera, producer is joining me to read your emails because I can’t read. No, I’m just kidding. She’s going to read them to me so you can hear them, but I haven’t seen them yet, so these are done cold. I had no chance to rehearse my responses, so what you will get will be my spontaneous reaction to your question.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Well, with that as an introduction, let me turn it over to my wonderful producer and friend Sarah Guertin. Take it away, Sarah.

Sarah Guertin:
Thank you, Ned. Hello there.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
You’re very welcome. Hello.

Sarah Guertin:
Okay, today we are starting with an email from a woman named Karyl. She’s a 45 year old mother of two boys who both have ADHD.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
I just have to interrupt you because I’m looking at this. I have never seen Karyl spelled that way. This lady spells her name K-A-R-Y-L. Good for her, how to individualize a very generic name. This is Karyl with a very special spelling of Carol. Sorry for interrupting Sarah. My ADD runs away with me.

Sarah Guertin:
There you go.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Race car brain with bicycle brakes, just can’t stop myself.

Sarah Guertin:
Well, this question, not surprisingly Karyl discovered that she had ADHD after her sons were diagnosed. So her question today is about her own ADHD, and it’s about books, so you’re going to love this. She says, “I read for about 30 to 45 minutes to wind down in the evening with a mystery or with your book, Ned, which was the first one I hungrily devoured after the initial diagnosis.”

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Isn’t that nice?

Sarah Guertin:
“I have been able to zip through, but there are about eight books, different books on my shelf. I am reading, but have not finished. I don’t so much hold off on these books as a form of procrastination, although they do help me get sleepy enough to sleep every night. I see these books as golden opportunities for learning, so I want to savor each piece and put it into practice before moving onto the next nugget. I would not like to just gloss through the info just to get it done like some of the mundane tasks of my life, such as payroll and preparing tax docs for the CPA. The problem I see though, is that sometimes I take such a long break that most of what was already learned, I am not always able to connect with the new information.”

Sarah Guertin:
To give you an example, she said she’s currently reading Stephen Covey’s Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. “I am on page 150 out of 330 pages. I bought the book 20 years ago. That is an extreme example, but I’m wondering if I should give myself a kind of deadline for a book. If I’m not done with it, shall I just put it on the back burner “maybe” shelf and pick it up again? With strong coffee, colorful lists and an agenda book I am able to complete most of my other daily tasks with no problems. I would like to get your opinion on whether my evening reading routine needs tweaking. Shall I only have one or two books on the shelf or is it okay to be reading eight books at once?”

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Well, Karyl, let me tell you what I think, and it’s not what you’re going to expect to hear. You said you have eight different books on your shelf that you’re reading. I have about 2,000 throughout my house. I’d say even more than that. Of the 2,000, I may have read, oh, maybe 50 of them all the way through, and I don’t feel guilty about that, you see. I feel wonderful about it. I see these books, it’s like I own a beautiful apple orchard and my orchard is full of ripe ready, bright red apples. What makes this orchard special is that these apples never go bad. They never fall off the bow. They’re never… They’re just waiting for me to pluck one down and take a bite. I can take a bite and guess what? The apple still doesn’t go bad and I can stick it back up on the tree. They’re replaceable stems, you know?

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
My orchard is always there waiting for me, any book I can pull off the shelf and you’re right, if I hadn’t read it for 10 years, I’d had trouble coming back to it. The person who really taught me this wonderful way of looking at things, I was an English major at Harvard, and when I was finishing my degree, at Harvard, you get what’s called a tutor and it’s a professor in your field and you meet with him or her one-on-one. I had this legendary professor for two years, junior and senior year, William Alford was his name. He’s now in heaven, but he was just the most wonderful, wonderful man in the world. I sort of breathlessly confessed to him in our final meeting, we were talking about the greatest novelists of all time, and we were compiling a list, and I said to him, because he put as his greatest novelist of all time Tolstoy.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
I looked down at the floor and I said, “Professor Alford, I just have to confess. I’ve never read War and Peace.” Without missing a beat, he said, “Oh, aren’t you lucky?” What he meant by that was I have such pleasure in store for me that instead of saying, “How can we call you a Harvard grad English major and you haven’t read the greatest novel ever written” and making me feel ashamed and guilty, which is what an awful lot of professors would have done, he immediately said, “Oh, you’re so lucky you have that pleasure yet in store for you.” That’s the way… By the way, I still haven’t read War and Peace, so I guess I’m still very lucky, but I guess what I’m saying is if you can look at those books as pleasures waiting for you…

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Now it’s true enough, if you don’t get back to some of them pretty soon, you’ll forget what’s in them and you’ll have to catch up, but I wouldn’t guilt trip myself about it. I wouldn’t say, “Oh, I’m a bad person. I have eight books going.” I would say that’s a indicator of how enthusiastic you are, how curious you are, how varied your tastes are. You go from a mystery to a science, to a history, to a memoir, and you like to change it up. You don’t want to just stick with one genre or one author because, after all, this is not an assignment. There’s no exam. You have the freedom to peruse your shelf, as you would like to. Think of it as your special apple orchard, with all these beautiful, bright red, shiny apples hanging from the branches and they never go bad. They never go rotten. They just hang there waiting for you to come eat them.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
This is one problem I would reframe not as a problem at all, but as a delight and the fact that you want to read and that you’re curious and imaginative, that’s all and you just need these books to feed that curiosity and imagination. I hope that makes sense to you. I hope I freed you from feeling like you’re somehow failing the course or not doing your duty as a reader and encouraging you just to run wild, run free in your own personal orchard.

Sarah Guertin:
I love that. You always know just what to say.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
I still remember Bill Alford saying that to me, “Oh, you’re so lucky.”

Sarah Guertin:
Well, and like you said, you’re still lucky, right?

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Exactly. I still haven’t read it.

Sarah Guertin:
Maybe you’ll read it some day.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Some day. I hope.

Sarah Guertin:
Okay. This next email we have is from Donna who lives in London. She wrote in part, “Hello, Dr. Ned. I’ve listened to many of your podcasts and have to thank you for how informative and helpful I have found the topics, but I hope you can help me with a trait I’m finding problematic to get help for. I have a big problem when it comes to driving. I have never felt I’m a confident driver. Even when I was learning to drive, rather than getting easier and more relaxed with each lesson, I was getting more anxious to the point where I would sweat excessively through nerves. I must have had over 300 lessons over a two year period. Driving did not and has not come naturally. Driving for me is more like an ordeal than a pleasurable experience.

Sarah Guertin:
After looking into the traits of ADD, I now believe that my brain becomes so overwhelmed with the task of driving, which is why I struggle with it. Having the inability to sustain attention with what my brain classes as a boring task, trying to stay focused, transitioning from one task to another requires the brain to shift its focus, and now I understand that that causes the brain to overreact and go into a startled state, leading to the feeling of anxiousness. It was just by luck I passed my driving test in my early twenties, but I’ve been left these last 20 years not understanding why I had this problem with driving. What can I do to get over this trait? How do I stop my brain sabotaging my ability to drive? It’s probably worth pointing out that I’m single, I live on my own and live miles away from friends and family, so I do not have a close network near me, and with the coronavirus lockdown, there are social distancing rules in place, so not able to see others currently.”

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Well, it’s a very common problem that people with ADHD are not good drivers. In fact, Russ Barkley has researched this, and traffic accidents of all kinds are eight times more common amongst us who have ADHD than the general population. If you think about it, it makes sense. You’re daydreaming and you don’t see the stop sign. You’d be willing to stop, and you actually do see it. I mean, it lands on your occipital cortex, but you don’t do anything with having seen it. In other words, you see it, but you don’t comprehend it. So you see the stop sign visually, you’re not blind, but you don’t comprehend it. You don’t turn it into the action of stopping your vehicle. If you’re driving through stop signs, you’re going to have accidents and sometimes tragic accidents, so you’re hardly alone.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Now what to do about it? You’ve had over 300 lessons over a two year period. I think you’ve demonstrated that you don’t have a natural ability to drive happily and confidently. One question I would ask, however, is are you taking medication for your ADD? Because that could make a huge difference. If the meds work, and we’re talking Ritalin, Adderall, the stimulant medications, if they work, they could turn you into a good driver. It’s just that simple. It’d be like getting eyeglasses. If you get the right eye glasses, suddenly you can see, you can drive better. Rather than taking another 300 lessons, I would say, try to get on the right medication. A medication will work about 80% of the time, so it’s a pretty good batting average. Otherwise, you really are endangering yourself and others by driving.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
I hate to put it that way, but it’s true. If you can’t drive, if you’re so anxious that you’re driving along a nervous wreck, you’re better off not to drive, to take public transportation or Uber or Lyft, or have a friend or what have you. Try and create some kind of social community where people can pick you up and take you to where you’re going. Those would be my two suggestions. Is your ADD being treated? I don’t think… If you’re not taking medication, I do think it would be really worthwhile your getting a trial of it because when the meds work, they truly give you the ability to sustain attention. You say you have the inability to sustain attention. Well with meds, you could gain the ability to sustain attention.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Then driving, even though you class it as boring, you could drive well enough to stay out of trouble. Remember, thinking of it as boring, it puts you in a dangerous spot because if you have an accident, suddenly it’s anything but boring. Obviously, it can end your life or someone else’s life or leave you with terrible, terrible consequences. So my two bits of advice, number one, look into a trial of medication, and number two, look into ways of living your life without driving a car, and lots and lots of people do that. Between public transportation and Uber and Lyft and friends picking you up, it is possible to live in this world without driving an automobile. Thank you for your question. It’s a really interesting question and brings to light one of the really dangerous aspects of having untreated ADHD, namely the dramatic increase in traffic accidents.

Sarah Guertin:
That’s really interesting. I didn’t know that. Okay. This next question comes from Anita. She writes, “Hello, Dr. Ned. I’m a 36 year old mother of three. My nine-year-old son was diagnosed with ADHD a year ago and I cried with relief because here was a plausible explanation for everything. I knew he was a brilliant empathetic child, but I couldn’t explain the cause of his symptoms. However, I understood his symptoms because I was wrestling with them my entire life as well, especially emotional regulation.

Sarah Guertin:
Last week, I was also diagnosed with ADHD, but this was not so much of a surprise, just a formality. I didn’t want to self-diagnose, so I went to my doctor and got a proper evaluation. We will both be starting Concerta next week, and I’m excited for us both to finally feel what it’s like, quote, “to have the glasses on,” as you put it. In my gut, I think my 11 year old daughter has the inattentive type and because of her natural brilliance, it wasn’t picked up at her school the way my son’s hyperactive ADHD was picked up. Should I get her an evaluation? Thank you very much, and God bless you and your lovely wife and team.”

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Well, thank you so much for that and God bless you as well and your children, and a very sweet way to end your email. Should you get your daughter an evaluation? Absolutely 100% yes. Females, whether it be the children or adults, are the most undiagnosed group. Why? Because they’re not disruptive like your son was was disruptive, and he called attention to his symptoms, but your daughter could be just sitting there quietly daydreaming in class. She’s very smart, so she’s able to get by without doing much in terms of class presence, engagement, or participation, but nonetheless, she’s missing a lot. You ask her what is it like to be in the classroom, and she’ll say, “It’s fine. I’m almost never there,” because her mind is wandering. So it’s absolutely worthwhile to get your daughter, and 11 years old as a perfect time to have a look. Just make sure you see someone who really understands ADHD because she doesn’t fit the stereotype of the hyperactive little boy, but she absolutely could have it.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
I look forward to you also getting the trial of medication because it could absolutely change your life. I mean, that’s the beauty of getting treated for this condition. You can really get a whole new lease on life. At 36 to be coming to terms with your ADHD at the same time that your son is, and maybe your daughter, that’s pretty wonderful. That’s a good Christmas present to your entire family. Stay in touch, and let me know how this works out. I’d love to get a follow-up email from you once you’ve gotten into seeing how the treatment goes.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
When we come back, we’ll hear from a listener who is going through a separation with his wife and his ADHD is a point of contention. Okay, so Sarah, I understand there’s a new offer from our wonderful sponsor, OmegaBrite Wellness.

Sarah Guertin:
Yes there is, and we’re really excited. I like to call it the Ned Pack because basically our listeners are going to have the chance to take what you take every day. All you have to do is add the OmegaBrite 7010 MD Omega 3 to your cart at Omegabritewellness.com, and if you use the coupon code Ned, your name, N-E-D, it’ll automatically add a free bottle of OmegaBrite CBD Full Spectrum, 25 milligram soft gels to the cart and you get free shipping. So pretty cool.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Wow, that’s an excellent offer. I’m so glad they’re using my name, not in vain, but to bring people to this wonderful product. It is a wonderful product.

Sarah Guertin:
It makes it nice and easy.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Yeah, and my wife really, if they really want to get someone who loves it, they should get my wife Sue on, and she’s very skeptical about all kinds of things. I mean, she laughs at me for the various stuff I take, but this is one that she absolutely swears by. So I’m glad to know. They just go to Omegabritewellness.com and put in the code Ned and they get all this cool stuff?

Sarah Guertin:
Yep. They just have to add the OmegaBrite 7010 MD Omega 3 to their cart, and then with the promo code, they’ll automatically get the free CBD Full Spectrum 25 milligram soft gels. They’ll get free shipping, and I should note that this is limited to the first 250 Distraction listeners, so people kind of got to move on it if they’re interested.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Okay, and the offer code is Ned?

Sarah Guertin:
That’s right, N-E-D.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Very good. Okay. Thank you, Sarah.

Sarah Guertin:
Thank you.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Okay. We’re back now. Let me ask the wonderful Sarah, what is the next question?

Sarah Guertin:
This next one is from a listener named Miles who is going through a separation with his wife and he is struggling. Miles actually recorded his question for you. So Scott, can we hear that?

Miles:
Hi Ned, this is miles. I’ve been listening to your podcast for, I don’t know, a month now or so. I’m 42 years old and diagnosed with ADHD in fourth grade. I now have twin boys that are three years old and a marriage, which is going through a separation and also own my own business, and my most recent business started in the end of 2015, just before we had kids. I’m starting to understand my ADHD quite a bit more and things are majorly overwhelming. I have some resources that I’ve been working with right now that I’ve been fortunate, but can’t seem to get enough of what I need to make a difference quickly enough. My question to you is this. Working with our marriage therapist, I am pretty much labeled as atypical, although my therapist is really pretty understanding of me and that’s been a gigantic relief. When I work with him individually, I feel his support.

Miles:
However, when we work together with my wife, it just feels as though I’m labeled as atypical, and somehow my wife thinks that I need to be doing the majority of the changing here, and it’s not her. My thought on this is that, hey, there’s two people in a relationship together and what needs to happen is that the two people need to understand each other in order to figure out a way to work with each other best just as though it would be two different people, each with their own personality. I’m curious what your thoughts are on not only being labeled atypical during therapy, and that basically undermining my part in the relationship, as well as how a relationship should work with two people where one has ADHD.

Miles:
I guess a side question would be how to get my wife to understand me better so I can avoid just being labeled as I confide in her, and at the same time, let me think what I was going to say. I’ll probably put it in an email to you as I remember. All right, thanks again. Bye.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Well, Miles of course, in any couple, takes two to tango. Very often people come into couples therapy and the either explicitly stated or implicit message is if only the other person would change, everything will be fine. We’re sort of saying, “I want her to change. I want him to change.” Of course the only person you stand a chance of changing is yourself, your behavior. What often happens in a couple where one has ADHD and the other does not is a kind of parent child dynamic develops where the non-ADD spouse feels like, in this case her husband, is another and she’s picking up after him and reminding him to do things and getting exasperated with him, and the ADD spouse, in this case you, feels like he’s a little boy who’s being chastised by a scolding mother and that’s very anti-romantic and leads to all kinds of problems.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
If the couples therapist could help identify, first of all, is that dynamic in play, and if it is, make sure your ADD is treated and then begin to address that parent-child dynamics so you can become partners instead of a parent and a child, if there’s still time for that. Often, a good therapist who understands ADHD can truly save a relationship. Now maybe this relationship is just not meant to be and you should separate, and that’s the end of it, but in your next relationship, you want to watch out for this. As for his calling you atypical, I have no idea what that means. As far as I’m concerned, we’re all atypical. what does he say to his other patients, “Well you’re typical”? I mean, I don’t know what that means.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
I think we all have our funny parts and we all have parts that we share with others as well. I think the label atypical is pretty unhelpful and maybe his shorthand for saying there are parts of you that he can’t make sense of, and I would say there are parts of everyone that we can’t make sense of. I would suggest that you pursue trying to sort out the parent-child dynamic, if that does exist, pursue getting your ADHD treated as you want to get the most mileage you can out of medication because that’s the easiest intervention we’ve got. Then based on the increased focus you get from that, begin to discuss with your wife the dynamics so you can recreate the romance that brought you together in the first place. Okay. Thank you. Thank you very much. Sarah, do we have another email?

Sarah Guertin:
We certainly do. I was just going to say we like that he recorded that one and was able to record it.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Yes. Yes.

Sarah Guertin:
That was perfect.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Yeah, absolutely.

Sarah Guertin:
This last question comes from a listener who wanted to remain anonymous, but it says in part, “Dear Dr. Hallowell, I have one question specifically that I could not find the answer in any of your books or podcasts, how exactly to find the right dosage for medication. I know you talk a lot about fine tuning medication. I have a psychiatrist prescribing Adderall to me. I get tremendous great results from Adderall with no side effects that I can note, but if I see great improvement with 30 milligrams, shall I go to 40 plus milligrams if I get even better results and advantage? As the improvement is relative, how do you find the optimum dosage? I feel the higher the dosage, the better I perform, so is it recommended to go to the highest possible dose, and what is that for Adderall? Is there any potential of building tolerance? Should I only use the minimum effective dose and leave room for an increase in the future in case I build a tolerance? Thanks so much for all your great work and support. You have changed my life with your publications and podcasts.”

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Well dosing, when it comes to stimulant medication, is unusual in that most medications are given on a milligram per kilogram basis. In other words, you weigh 80 kilograms, you would take X number of milligrams of the medication based upon that. Most medications, that’s how the dosing is determined. In stimulants, it’s not the case. It’s some big people need a little and some little people need a lot. It’s based on brain receptor sites that we can’t measure. The way you find out the right dose is trial and error. Now the good news is these meds are in and out of your system the same day. You can try two or three different doses in the space of a week. It’s not like you’re waiting around forever.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Once you get a positive response, you can continue to increase. I wouldn’t leap by 10 milligram increments. I’d probably do by five milligram increments, but you can keep increasing until you get target symptom improvement or side effects. You’ll know you’re too high if you start getting side effects, and the three that you want to particularly look out for, number one, weight loss, number two, elevated heart rate, number three, elevated blood pressure, and then insomnia as well. Those are sort of the four leading ones, and the two most critical naturally are elevated heart rate and elevated blood pressure. If your blood pressure goes sky high, you got to stop the meds. Get a blood pressure cuff and learn how to take your pulse, measure your heart rate, and with your doctor’s supervision, you can increase by five milligram increments every other day until you get the sweet spot where you say, “Okay, this is good.”

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
If you bump it up five, you start getting side effects, you say, “Okay, I’ll just go back to the previous level.” That’s how you zero in on the optimum dosing. Trial and error is really the way to do it, but fortunately you can go through many trials in a short amount of time. Tolerance usually not. What happens sometimes is someone will say, “Well, the meds just aren’t working the way they used to.” What you want to do then is just stop them for a few days and then restart them at the same dose, and they’ll usually kick in effective again.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
You don’t want to keep chasing increasing dosing levels. It’s not necessary, and obviously it’s a bad idea because you’re going into higher and higher doses. Usually once you get the right dose, you stick with that and stay there for years. Years, and years and years. I have patients who’ve been on the same dose of Vyvanse for 10 years. You don’t need to be increasing it and you don’t need to save room for going up in case you get tolerance. Try to get the optimum dose by trial and error and then stick with it. If it seems to stop working, don’t increase the dose. Just stop the meds for a few days and then start back up at the same dose.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Thank you for your question. It’s always an interesting one because these meds are unusual in the dosing is not based on milligrams per kilogram. And thank you for your thank you. It’s really nice to hear good words like that.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
Well, that’s going to do it for today. I hope you all had fun. I hope you enjoyed it. I hope you learned a lot. If you did, please tell your friends. We’re trying to grow our audience, and the best way to do that is for you to tell other people about us. Thank you of all of you who reached out, and please, if any of you feel moved to write a question, write it, email it, record it, whatever. We will almost definitely be airing your question and I’ll get a chance to take a stab at providing my best answer that I can come up with.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
If you have a question or comment you’d like us to include in a future episode, write it or record it and send it to, here you come, here you come, [email protected] Send it to connect the word, [email protected] Remember, please, to follow Distraction on social media and subscribe to the podcast wherever you listen so you’ll never miss an episode. I’m now also on TikTok, if you can believe that. I’m loving TikTok. It’s perfect, perfect format, 62nd bits about different parts of ADHD. You can find me there too. My username is @Dr.Hallowell.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
I’m Dr. Ned Hallowell. Thank you so much for joining us today. I love this audience. I just appreciate lending me your ears, as it were. Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our recording engineer and editor is the amazingly talented Scott [inaudible 00:32:15], and our producer is the also amazingly talented Sarah Guertin. Thank you all, and see you next Time.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:
The episode you just heard, just now heard, was made possible by my good friends at OmegaBrite Wellness. Get a free bottle of OmegaBrite CBD Full Spectrum soft gels with free shipping. When you buy one bottle of their 7010 MD Omega 3. Use offer code Ned. That’s my name, at omegabritewellness.com.

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