Strengthen the Cerebellum to Improve ADHD Symptoms

Strengthen the Cerebellum to Improve ADHD Symptoms

Dr. John Ratey joins Ned to share the latest research on how underdeveloped cerebellums affect executive functions like regulating emotions and staying focused. They discuss Dr. Jeremy Schmahmann’s Dysmetria of Thought theory, and share specific ways those with ADHD can build up this part of their brain. 

Learn more about Dr. John Ratey HERE

October is ADHD Awareness Month and we want to hear your ideas for the show! Write an email or record a voice memo with your thoughts and send it to [email protected].

Thanks to our sponsor, OmegaBrite Wellness! Distraction listeners, you can SAVE 20% on your first order with the promo code: Podcast2020 at OmegaBriteWellness.com.

Click HERE to learn more about our sponsor, Landmark College, in Putney, Vermont. It’s the college of choice for students who learn differently.

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin and our recording engineer/editor is Scott Persson.

Check out this episode!

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Ned’s Short List of Good Distractions

Ned’s Short List of Good Distractions

Pandemic-life these days can be quite stressful, so finding ways to give your brain a break is key to maintaining a healthy balance. Our host shares a few of the things he’s been doing to take his mind off of the pandemic, politics and other upsetting topics in this week’s mini Distraction.

Reach out to us with your comments, questions and show ideas! Send us an email, or record a voice memo on your phone and send it to [email protected]

Learn more about our sponsor, OmegaBrite CBD! Distraction listeners can SAVE 20% on their first order with the code: Podcast2020. Shop online at OmegaBriteWellness.com.

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin and our recording engineer/editor is Pat Keogh.

Check out this episode!

A transcript of this episode can be found below.


Dr. Ned Hallowell:

This episode of Distraction is sponsored by OmegaBrite CBD, formulated by OmegaBrite Wellness, creators of the number one Omega3 supplements for the past 20 years. OmegaBrite CBD, safe, third-party tested, and it works. Shop online at omegabritewellness.com.

This is Dr. Ned Hallowell with a mini episode of Distraction. During the pandemic, each week, we do a mini episode that touches in some way upon this phenomenon that we’ve all been living within and today’s is going to be a lighthearted one. I want to talk about things that I have been doing myself to divert me from the perils of the day, to take my mind off of the pandemic, politics and other upsetting topics. I just thought I’d go down the list of what I’ve done either alone or with family members, not an exhaustive list, of course, but just a few things that came trippingly to my tongue or instantly to my mind.

One thing, I have been binge watching Schitt’s Creek. Now, if you’ve never seen Schitt’s Creek, it is funny. I really recommend it to you. My wife started watching it and she described it to me and I said, “I don’t think that sounds good.” It is terrific. It is uproariously funny. It is so, so, so, so funny. If you don’t find the show funny, something’s happened to your funny bone. Just thinking about it, with Eugene Levy, with the big eyebrows, it’s just hysterically funny.

I also made a purchase while waiting in line because we have to wait in line to get into certain stores, and the line outside of Whole Foods happens to have a bunch of hanging flowers for sale. So I bought two of these hanging flower pots, one predominant color pink, the other predominant color violet, and I hung them from hooks on our front porch. Now, when you buy hanging flower pots, you have to water the flowers. So that’s what I’ve been doing each day, and in order to water the flowers, I’m not quite tall enough to reach the watering can up. So I bought a little step stool. So I have my step stool on the porch, along with my watering can and I get up there every day or every other day and water these flowers. I’m telling you, it’s really rewarding to see them flourish and grow and they’re bushier, and hanging downer more, and just lovely to behold.

Also, someone left us a pot of pansies as sort of a gift during this time and I’ve been watering that as well and they are just flourishing. My gosh, there were a few stray strands of pansy in the original. Now it’s just like a pansy bush. So we’ve got the blue pansies, the violet flowers, the pink flowers and the porch, it just lifts my spirits. I also wrote a letter to David Brooks, the columnist in the New York Times. He wrote a column on Friday, the 26th, about five problems that we’re dealing with that I just thought it was a wonderful column.

I’ve also been cooking. I go online and I look for recipes and there’s a gazillion recipes online. They’ll have 32 ways of turning ground meat into a meal or 17 side dishes for the 4th of July, and I love these and I go download them, I print them out and next thing you know, I’m cooking them up. Like tomorrow, I’m going to make a vegetable chicken stew in the crackpot. Tuesdays is my day to make dinner, so I’ll put it in in the morning, and by the time evening rolls around, we’ll have this yummy, delicious stew. Online recipe shopping is another activity that I highly recommend.

Play with a dog. We’re lucky because my daughter is here and with her comes her a little Chiweenie named Layla. As you know, I think dogs are God’s greatest creation. Been playing with Layla every chance I get. Then when my son brings over his dog, Max, we had to play with both dogs and out in the backyard, the two of them rushing around.

Then one final thing I got for my daughter, because she really wanted this, a inflatable pool, above ground obviously, that it’s big enough for her to put a inflatable raft in it so she can lie in the sun, in the water, on the water and to see the smile on her face, when this thing arrived. It didn’t cost a huge amount. It was $300. I know that’s not nothing, but it was affordable and it was joy, joy, joy, joy. This is all along the lines of specializing. That’s my term for making the ordinary extraordinary. Turning what’s a dismal situation into one that’s a playful, fun, rewarding, interesting, engaging.

So that’s my little list. Binge-watched Schitt’s Creek, water the hanging flowers, write a letter to David Brooks, cook up new stuff, play with the dog and get something special for your daughter, in my case, it was this inflatable pool. Let’s try to do these things for one another. Let’s try to stay connected, even though we have to keep our distance. Let’s try to bring each other messages and vibes of goodwill, of joy, of understanding, of harmony. Let’s try to get along.

Okay, before I say goodbye, I’d like to remind you to check out OmegaBrite CBD. I’ve been taking the CBD supplement myself for nearly three months and I have noticed it’s definitely helping with my feelings of irritability and random anxiety. You can get OmegaBrite CBD online at omegabritewellness.com. That’s O-M-E-G-A-B-R-I-T-E-wellness.com, Brite intentionally misspelled. They have a deal for Distraction listeners right now as well. You’ll save 20% off your first order when you use the promo code podcast 2020. That’s podcast 2020. OmegaBrite CBD, safe, third-party tested, and it works.

Please continue to connect with us. Share your thoughts, questions, and show ideas by emailing us at [email protected]. That’s [email protected] Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is the multi-talented and several voice levels, Sarah Guertin, and our recording engineer and editor is the impish and brilliant Pat Keogh. I am Dr. Ned Hallowell. Thank you so very much for joining our community and listening to our podcast.

The episode of Distraction you just heard was sponsored by OmegaBrite CBD formulated by OmegaBrite Wellness, creators of the number one Omega3 supplements for the past 20 years. OmegaBrite CBD, safe, third-party tested, and it works. Shop online at omegabritewellness.com.

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How to Stop Losing Your Stuff with How to ADHD and Landmark College

How to Stop Losing Your Stuff with How to ADHD and Landmark College

If you can’t ever remember where you put your keys, phone, wallet or whatever, help is on the way! Jessica McCabe of How to ADHD shares a bunch of useful tips and strategies to help you stop losing things in this special episode sponsored by Landmark College in Putney, Vermont. It’s the college of choice for students who learn differently!

Check out all of Jessica’s amazing ADHD content on her website at HowtoADHD.

Share your thoughts with us by writing an email, or recording a message using the voice memo app on your phone, and sending it to [email protected]

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin (@sarahguertin) and our recording engineer/editor is Pat Keogh.

Do you know a student with ADHD or other learning difference looking for a higher education experience? Tell them about our sponsor, Landmark College, in Putney, Vermont. Find out more HERE.

Check out this episode!

A transcript of this episode is below.


Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Hello, this is Dr Ned Hallowell and welcome to Distraction. I’m here with a special episode brought to you by our wonderful sponsor Landmark College in beautiful, beautiful Putney, Vermont. The college of choice for students who learn differently.

And to help with this special episode, I am joined by one of our all time favorites, Jessica McCabe, the host of How to ADHD, which now she told me has 360,000 followers. So you should join and be 360,001.

Not that many people follow something unless it’s really worthwhile. And Jessica, she’s just full of positive energy and wisdom and smarts and knowledge and for her tender young age, she sure does know an awful lot. Welcome to Distraction, Jessica.

Jessica McCabe:

Thank you. Gosh, you are just so good for my self esteem. Probably everybody should be on the show just to hear how you talk about them. Thank you. That was really kind of you.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

It is all true. What was it you wanted to talk to us about in this special episode?

Jessica McCabe:

I do work really hard to create a good show. I also lose things a lot. And I finally tackled that on the channel and I wanted to talk about here too because while I was doing the research and writing that episode, I realized how much of a difference it made in my life that I lost everything. It was my first ADHD symptom that I remember. I would come home without my jacket almost every day. I spent way too much time looking through the lost and found box, and I used to feel really bad about it. It affected my life in a lot of ways because then I wouldn’t have my favorite whatever.

Or, I remember in fourth grade somebody gave me these really precious earrings and they were the first time that somebody gave me real gemstone earrings. It was a family friend and they were real Topaz, which is my birthstone. And it was like two days before I lost them and I felt so bad. And since then I’ve always told people, “Don’t give me anything nice because I will lose it.”

And I’ve also just carried around this sense of like incompetence and paid the ADHD tax of having to replace things so many times. And I used to just think this was this character defect. It was just something wrong with me that I keep, this is why I can’t have nice things. And then I realized doing this research, it really is our ADHD that makes it so difficult to hold onto things. We’re often distracted when we put stuff down or we impulsively set it down for just a second and then end up doing five other things. And then when we go looking for things to make things more challenging, our brains don’t filter out extraneous stimuli very well.

When we go looking for the thing, we see all these other things that need our attention. So we end up responding to these. And this, by the way, is also often why we’re late. And so it has this incredible ripple effect throughout our entire lives that we lose things so often. And I finally decided to tackle it.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Yes. And how did you do that?

Jessica McCabe:

Well, I took my mom’s advice. She always told us growing up, “Have a place for everything and everything in its place.” Have a dedicated place for everything so that you know when you are distracted you can still automatically put things where they go and you know where to look for it later so it’s easy to find it.

And for her, that’s the end of the story and that’s great. But the thing is, for those of us with ADHD brains, the very same parts of our brain that benefit from having a place for everything are also the ones that make it, those are the parts of our brain that make it really hard to have a place for everything.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

It is. Right.

Jessica McCabe:

Because, I don’t know about you, I walk into a room and I just explode. Whatever got with me is suddenly just all over the room. It’s really hard for me actually. I know there are some people with ADHD that can be extremely organized and that’s a coping mechanism for them.

I try. Every fall, going back to school, I would try and I’d have these elaborate systems that I would set up and I would just, they would fall apart within a week or two. So I think, from the research that I’ve done, I think the key to cutting back on losing things, and I don’t think it’s ever going to be perfect, but the key to reducing the amount of things that we lose is to make it more ADHD friendly to have a place for everything.

One of those strategies that I found is to do what’s called putting things at the point of performance. Where we use the thing, is where the thing should go. And for me, and for probably a lot of people with ADHD, that means having multiple copies of things. I used to think it was a waste of money to do that. But then I think about all the jobs I’ve lost from being late or the extra things that I’ve had to buy because I lost them. And it’s actually more cost effective probably to just have a charger at every station that you tend to charge your devices at so you don’t port it everywhere and lose it and then don’t have it. And then your phone dies and then you can’t call work to tell them you’re going to be late, or whatever it is.

Yeah. Have a charger at every place that you tend to charge your phone. I tend to train my dog in the kitchen, so that’s where I put her treats. I tend to need her to leave me alone when I’m in the office, so that’s where I put her bones. I started really being conscious about put things where I will use them.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Just such a good principle. Let me just quickly interrupt and say, Jessica is brought to us through the courtesy and good will of Landmark College, the school for students who learn differently. It is located in beautiful Putney, Vermont.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

So please go on Jessica, sorry to interrupt.

Jessica McCabe:

No, you can tell I’m really passionate about this. I’m like, I must share this with everybody. Because I wish, this is what I wish I’d known when I was in college. It would have made things a lot easier.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Yeah. I’m sure it would of.

Jessica McCabe:

That, yeah, put things where you’re going to use them and then also make it as easy as possible to put it back. Because it doesn’t matter if there’s a place for everything, if it doesn’t actually end up in that place. But I tend to be really impulsive, really impatient. And so things like I have a coat closet but it’s so much effort to open the door, get a hanger out, take my jacket off, put the jacket on the hanger, zip it up, stick it back in and close the door. So I just got a coat rack and I just throw my coat on that and now I’ll actually do it instead of it ending up on the couch or on the floor.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

You have to make the place user-friendly, too.

Jessica McCabe:

Yeah, exactly. And the cool thing is by making it user friendly for somebody with ADHD, it really makes it user friendly for everybody. There’s really no reason not to do this. Minimize the number of steps involved, make it mentally easy by making it clear where the thing goes. Label makers are really good for this. If you don’t have a label maker, a post it note or whatever. It seems so silly to have to do this, but it really does help our brains out so much if we don’t have to process, okay, I’m holding this thing, where does this thing go?

Jessica McCabe:

If there’s just a label that says “This is where it goes.” It’s like, okay, I don’t even have to think about it. It’s going to be so much more likely that I put it there. Clear containers, I never really understood why this was recommended for people with ADHD all the time and then I got some and I’m like, right. Because now my dog’s bones are in a clear container, so I don’t have to remember which container it’s in or even read a label. I can just see them, and it’s so much easier.

Jessica McCabe:

And then the other couple of tips, make it satisfying or enjoyable. If you get a mini reward for putting it there, there’s a key hook you really like, it makes you smile every time you look at it, you’re more likely to put your keys there. If you have a pretty comforter or a bedspread, if you like the way your bed looks when it’s made, maybe you’ll be a little more likely to make it. And again, these are things where it’s like, that shouldn’t matter. We get stuck in shoulds and shouldn’ts and I should just do the thing. I shouldn’t need this extra stuff.

Jessica McCabe:

But still, this is the way our brain works.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Absolutely.

Jessica McCabe:

And I think we should use whatever tools we have at our disposal.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Absolutely. No, and the fact that you feel good once you do it as a natural reinforcer.

Jessica McCabe:

Yeah, exactly. And we do, we need those little reinforcements. Because the whole well you know, it’ll be good for me to get into this habit. That’s just not motivating enough, to be honest. When you’ve got a million other things going on, you’ve got other things you’re thinking about. It’s just like, you’re not thinking when you throw your coat on the ground, you’re not thinking, God, then I’m going to have to go dry clean it and this and that.

It’s just in that moment it’s the easiest thing. If you make the easiest thing to throw it on a coat hook, well, now you don’t have to worry about it later. And then, and this I think is worth mentioning, a lot of times people see, walk into somebody’s house with ADHD and this has happened to me. Or somebody’s bedroom with ADHD, and they’re like, “God, this is a mess. Let me help you clean it up.” I’m actually really opposed to this because if somebody comes in and helps us clean up and we don’t know where things go, well now we really have no idea where anything is.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Yeah. That’s awful.

Jessica McCabe:

Right?

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Yeah.

Jessica McCabe:

And so sometimes we have organizational strategies that maybe don’t make sense to other people, but I’m a really big believer in we should be the ones to clean up. We can get support, having a body double there, having somebody in the room with us, encouraging us or whatever. But we should be the ones to do it so that we know where things go.

This was part of the problem. My mom used to clean up for me all the time and at the time it was like, that’s great. And then the next morning I’d go to look for my stuff and I’ve no idea where it is. And then I never learned how to clean up myself. And so now I’m an adult and I’ve no, my apartments are always a disaster because I’m like, wait, this apartment didn’t come with a mom.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Not many apartments do.

Jessica McCabe:

No, it’s really unfortunate. I keep looking for the apartment that comes with that as an amenity and I’ve yet to find it.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Well, if you get really wealthy then you can just hire someone to do everything for you. But even then you want the feeling of I’m doing some of this by myself.

Jessica McCabe:

Yeah. And you want to be able to know where stuff goes. I’ve had a maid come and clean before and just I’m completely lost for like a week. I don’t know where they put anything.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Yeah. Right. Exactly.

Jessica McCabe:

So at the very least, we should be involved in the decision making process of where things should go, and then label them. And then a couple more things is, this I learned from waiting tables, which is scan for strays.

Before you leave a room or at the end of the day, you scan for things that aren’t where they belong and put them back as you go. Because that’s generally a lot more ADHD friendly than, especially if you’re a student, if you’re in college going “Saturdays I clean my room.” Probably not. It’s probably not going to happen. But if you get in the habit of scanning as you go and at least the things you know you’re going to need, like, “There’s a textbook on my bed. I should probably put that back on the bookshelf or back in my backpack or wherever I need it to be.”

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

What’s the line from waiting tables. What did you say?

Jessica McCabe:

Scan for strays. Look for anything that’s not, as a server you’re looking for-

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

What does that have to do with waiting tables?

Jessica McCabe:

As a server, you’re constantly looking for dirty dishes or constantly looking for the coffee pot isn’t where it’s supposed to go. The trays aren’t where they’re supposed to go. You’re constantly-

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Scan for, I waited tables for a whole summer and I never learned about scan for strays, so. That’s a great principle, scan for strays.

Jessica McCabe:

Yeah. And that way you clean as you go, which is a lot, it’s just a lot more tolerable. It doesn’t feel as big a thing, but you’re constantly cleaning up just a little bit and then it doesn’t get as overwhelming I think.

And then the last thing is keeping consistent. It can be hard, when you’re moving, when you’re going to college, but if you try to have whatever spot you set up, have that stay consistent as possible, then it’s a lot easier because if a spot for something keeps changing, it disrupts our ability to put it there automatically and know where to look. So I would deal with this when I used to think that having lots of purses was a good idea, because I’d have, things could be in my backpack or in this purse or in this purse or in this purse.

Jessica McCabe:

Finally I’m like, I get one purse. And one backpack. That’s it. Because the fewer that something could be, the less time we’re going to spend on looking for it.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Yeah. That’s such a great principle.

Jessica McCabe:

Thanks.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

The fewer places to look, the more likely you’ll find it.

Jessica McCabe:

Yeah. And then the last thing is, get a tile. Seriously, do you use those Dr. Hall?

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

Yes.

Jessica McCabe:

Do you use Tiles?

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

I have it on my key chain, all the time.

Jessica McCabe:

Yeah. Anything that travels that’s important, like a remote or your key chain or I stick it in my bullet journal. Anything you do have to take from place to place, it’s such a good idea to have a tracking device on it.

Jessica McCabe:

Yeah, I use Tile. I’m sure there are other ones out there, but that’s the one I was introduced to and I like them a lot.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

As always, Jessica, you are a treasure trove of tips. Any of you listening, you can find many more by going to Jessica’s website, HowtoADHD.com. And your YouTube channel is what? Just, How to ADHD again?

Jessica McCabe:

Yeah. youtube.com/howtoADHD.

Dr. Ned Hallowell:

That’s wonderful. That’s wonderful. Well, thank you so much. And Landmark College, thanks you, the wonderful sponsor that we have. Learn more about how they help students with ADHD succeed in college at LCDistraction.org.

I kid about it, but this truly is the best in the world at what they do. And if you want to get ready for college or supplement college or have it be your college experience and you have one of these wonderful brains that Jessica and I share and talk about, go to LCDistraction.org.

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. The podcast is recorded and edited by the amazingly talented Pat Keogh, and our producer is the unbelievably awesome star of stage and screen, Sarah Guertin. I’m Dr. Ned Hallowell, and thank you so much for listening.

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How to Take Care of Yourself in Times of Crisis

How to Take Care of Yourself in Times of Crisis

Lifestyle medicine expert and Harvard professor, Dr. Beth Frates, offers loads of practical advice on how to stay as healthy and well-balanced as possible during the pandemic. Listen as she guides Dr. H through breathing techniques, shares her insights on the foods we should be eating more of and the ones we should be avoiding, and gives listeners an overall guide to well-being through the 6 pillars of health.

Dr. Beth Frates Website: BethFratesMD.com

How are you coping? Reach out to us! Write an email, or record a message using the voice memo app on your phone and send it to [email protected]

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin (@sarahguertin) and our recording engineer/editor is Pat Keogh.

Do you know a student with ADHD or other learning difference looking for a higher education experience? Tell them about our sponsor, Landmark College, in Putney, Vermont. It’s the college of choice for students who learn differently. Find out more HERE.

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The Highs and Lows of Hyperfocus with How to ADHD and Landmark College

The Highs and Lows of Hyperfocus with How to ADHD and Landmark College

Our favorite ADHDer, Jessica McCabe, joins our host for a conversation about the positives and negatives of hyperfocus in this special episode brought to you by Landmark College in Putney, Vermont. It’s the college of choice for students who learn differently.

What are your thoughts on hyperfocus? Write an email, or record a message using the voice memo app on your phone and send it to [email protected]

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin (@sarahguertin) and our recording engineer/editor is Pat Keogh.

Do you know a student with ADHD or other learning difference looking for a higher education experience? Tell them about our sponsor, Landmark College, in Putney, Vermont. It’s the college of choice for students who learn differently. Find out more HERE.

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How To Say No

How To Say No

Dr. H shares a story about a time he should’ve said “no” and didn’t, and how it completely backfired on him. He shares two ways you can say “no” without hurting or offending the other party. And they’ll both leave you guilt-free!

Do you have a question or comment? Write an email or record a message using the voice memo app on your phone with your question and send it to [email protected]

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin (@sarahguertin) and our recording engineer/editor is Pat Keogh.

Do you know a student with ADHD or other learning difference looking for a higher education experience? Tell them about our sponsor, Landmark College, in Putney, Vermont. It’s the college of choice for students who learn differently. Find out more HERE.

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How Dr. H Manages His ADHD

How Dr. H Manages His ADHD

Our host, who has ADHD and dyslexia himself, reveals some of the tools he uses to effectively control his ADHD.

What’s in your ADHD toolbox? Let us know and we might share it in a future episode! Write an email or record a message using the voice memo app on your phone with your question and send it to [email protected]

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin (@sarahguertin) and our recording engineer/editor is Pat Keogh.

Learn about our sponsor, Landmark College, HERE.

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Is There an ADHD and Alzheimer’s Connection? And Other Listener Questions

Is There an ADHD and Alzheimer’s Connection? And Other Listener Questions

Dr. Hallowell addresses listener questions regarding ADHD and balance; Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease; natural treatment remedies and vitamin recommendations.

Thanks so much to our listeners Caroline, Anna, P.G. and Helen for sending in your questions!

Do you have a question or comment for Dr. Hallowell? Write an email or record a message using the voice memo app on your phone with your question and send it to [email protected]

Distraction is created by Sounds Great Media. Our producer is Sarah Guertin (@sarahguertin) and our recording engineer/editor is Pat Keogh.

Learn about our sponsor, Landmark College, HERE.

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Start the New Year with a Growth Mindset

Start the New Year with a Growth Mindset

A growth mindset is one’s belief in his or her own ability to learn and develop skills. And it’s a great place to begin a new year and decade!

Dr. Hallowell considers it a happy accident that he happened to attend a lecture given by third-grade teachers Darrah Parsons and Becky Kline. The talk focused on their experiences teaching young girls about Carol Dweck’s groundbreaking findings regarding ability and achievement in life. In this episode, Darrah and Becky join Dr. Hallowell to talk about the differences between a fixed mindset and a growth mindset, and why productive struggle is a really good thing. If you want to do more and be more in life, this episode is here to show you that you can! It’s never too late to change your mindset, achieve your goals and find success.

If you’d like to reach out to Darrah, email her at [email protected], and if you’d like to reach out to Becky, email [email protected].

Click HERE to go to Carol Dweck’s website.

Do you know someone who learns differently? Our sponsor, Landmark College, might be the right place for them. Learn more HERE.

This episode was originally released in December 2017.

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Protecting Your Intimate Relationships in a Poisonous Partisan World

Protecting Your Intimate Relationships in a Poisonous Partisan World

The “Trump Divorce” is a real thing! Marriages and other relationships where political opinions diverge are dissolving like never before. Today’s guest, Dr. Jeanne Safer, offers frank, practical advice for salvaging and strengthening your bonds with your loved ones through her latest book, I Love You, But I Hate Your Politics. Dr. Safer’s book is described as required reading for any politically-minded friend, relative, or significant other in the Trump era.

Learn more about Dr. Jeanne Safer HERE.

Tell us your thoughts! Record your comment using the voice memo app, or write an email and send it to [email protected].

Distraction is a production of Sounds Great Media. This episode was produced by Sarah Guertin @sarahguertin, and recorded and mixed by Pat Keogh. 

This episode is sponsored by Landmark College in Putney, Vermont. Please support Distraction by clicking HERE to learn more about the college of choice for students who learn differently!

Check out this episode!

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3 Tips To Avoid Avoidance

3 Tips To Avoid Avoidance

If you have an inbox full of unopened emails or a phone filled with a slew of unanswered voicemails, you are definitely not alone! But you can do something about it. Dr. H offers up three concrete ways to deal with whatever you’ve been putting off in this week’s mini Distraction.

What are you struggling with? We want to hear from you! Record your question or comment one your phone using the voice memo app and send it to [email protected].

Distraction is a production of Sounds Great Media. This episode was produced by Sarah Guertin @sarahguertin, and recorded and mixed by Pat Keogh. 

This episode is sponsored by Landmark College in Putney, Vermont. Please support Distraction by clicking HERE to learn more about the college of choice for students who learn differently!

Check out this episode!

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